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More quickly or quicker?



 
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ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
How to describe the 'new-old rate' of a secondhand stuff? | Difference between will and would
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More quickly or quicker? #1 (permalink) Sat Jun 12, 2004 10:22 am   More quickly or quicker?
 

Hello,

I often read phrases such as 'you can do that quicker' or 'this will calm you down quicker'.
According to the grammar books this wrong - it should be 'you can do that more quickly' and 'this will calm you down more quickly', shouldn't it?

Maybe, the first is American and the second British English? Anyway, it's confusing. Please, shed some light :)
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Quick #2 (permalink) Sat Jun 12, 2004 10:58 am   Quick
 

Hi,

Yes, you're right - according to the grammar books it should be 'more quickly' but then in speech 'quicker' is less of a mouthful than 'more quickly' and so it has now passed into common use. There is one expression where this is now widespread: The quicker you do it, the better or as it is shortened to: the quicker, the better.

Hope this helps

Alan
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Quick response, responding quickly #3 (permalink) Sat Jun 12, 2004 11:09 am   Quick response, responding quickly
 

Hi Alan,

Thank you very much for your quick response and for responding so quickly :)
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"more quickly" or "quicker" #4 (permalink) Thu Feb 19, 2009 14:09 pm   "more quickly" or "quicker"
 

Hello,

At present I'm working on the translation of an advertising leaflet into English.

I'm also having trouble rendering the comparative form of the adverb "quick" into good English, as I've heard many English native speakers use the form "quicker" rather than "more quickly". Even if the from "quicker" is in common usage in speech now - which form would you prefer in written English?

A friend of mine (English native speaker) said that "quicker" was more common, and she even looked this form up in the Cambridge International Dictionary ... Do you think a sentence like "Online media spread information much quicker than traditional advertising media" in a leaflet sounds like standard English?

Many thanks in advance!
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More quickly or quicker? #5 (permalink) Thu Feb 26, 2009 18:53 pm   More quickly or quicker?
 

Hi Andtrans,

I would personally stick to 'more quickly' in what strikes me as a 'formal' type of sentence. You would use 'much quicker' more naturally this way: The spread of information by online media was much quicker than by traditional advertising media.

Alan
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More quickly or quicker? #6 (permalink) Thu Feb 26, 2009 20:31 pm   More quickly or quicker?
 

As Alan said earlier, the other point is the ease with which the word can be spoken -- 'more succinct' versus 'succincter'.
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More quickly or quicker? #7 (permalink) Fri Feb 27, 2009 6:52 am   More quickly or quicker?
 

Hi Andtrans

The word quick is an adjective which is also frequently used in spoken or informal English as an adverb. For something such as an advertising leaflet, however, I agree with Alan: you should stick with the more traditional, formal grammar rules. In your sentence you need an adverb, so quickly would be the better choice. The comparative form is more quickly.

The alternative wording that Alan suggested uses quicker as a comparative adjective, not as an adverb. So that follows traditional grammar rules as well.

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