Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
direction; series of lessons or training units; layer; part of a meal
state
breakthrough
course
ad
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

How many tenses in your language?


Goto page Previous  1, 2
 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forums | What do you want to talk about?
Flags to symbolize languages? | Language students who fight
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
How many tenses in your language? #16 (permalink) Thu Jan 12, 2006 13:19 pm   How many tenses in your language?
 

Quote:
How many tenses are there in your mother tongue?


There are 17 tenses in Spanish (as in French) with two options in two of the tenses. On top of that, and as opposed to English, each tense has six different conjugations, according to the subject pronoun -- that's why we don't have to use these pronouns if we don't want to.

Why couldn't they have made it as simple as the good old and wise Chinese?
Conchita
Language Coach


Joined: 26 Dec 2005
Posts: 2826
Location: Madrid, Spain

How many tenses in your language? #17 (permalink) Sun Jan 15, 2006 15:32 pm   How many tenses in your language?
 

Jailbird wrote:
Yes, Russian and Ukranian are really alike and that's even funny when I read something written in Ukranian on the packet of juice and I understand practically everything. That's amazing!
And an off topic-somebody told me that it's possible to use THE Ukrania now... Is it still so or have they chaged this tendency already?!


Are the two languages really alike?

The police in Moscow stopped a Ukrainian man on the street. They angrily asked him, "Kak vasha familia?" He answered, "Ocheny khorosho! Mama zdorovaya, Papa tozhe! Yak vasha?"
Jamie (K)
Guest





In this story you'll learn how to use the English articlesEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!How many different ways with words do you know? Subscribe to free email English course
How many tenses in your language? #18 (permalink) Sun Jan 15, 2006 15:35 pm   How many tenses in your language?
 

Nicole wrote:
In German, there is simple present, simple past, present perfect, past perfect, future I and future II so that's 6 in total (at least that's what I think).
How many tenses are there in English?


Note that in German the simple past tense and the present perfect tense mean more or less the same thing. In English the two tenses often convey two different meanings, so German speakers learning English have trouble with them.
Jamie (K)
Guest





How many tenses in your language? #19 (permalink) Sun Jan 15, 2006 15:42 pm   How many tenses in your language?
 

I'm not positive how many tenses English has (I guess native speakers don't count them here), but I can tell you that African-American English Vernacular has more tenses than standard English. I am not joking; this is a documented fact.

How is this for a tense?

The police ask some kids, "Have you seen this man?" and the kids reply, "We been seen him!" In African-American dialect this means, "We saw him, but that was a very long time ago, and he is probably gone."

On TV I once saw two African-American women talking. One said, "I'm sorry. I should have told you." Her friend angrily answered, "You shoulda been told me!" That meant, "You should have told me a very long time ago, right at the beginning."

So they can say things with a verb tense that ordinary people speaking standard English need a whole phrase to say.
Jamie (K)
Guest





New english tenses? #20 (permalink) Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:36 am   New english tenses?
 

I think white Americans create new tenses too. I have a tape recording of a business man by the name of Kevin Trudeau and he uses the phrase 'they still would have went' instead of 'they still would have gone.'
Spearhead
You can meet me at english-test.net


Joined: 19 Oct 2005
Posts: 52
Location: Oslo

Went #21 (permalink) Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:40 am   Went
 

Hi,

This construction I would have went is very common in Scottish English.

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16523
Location: UK

I would have went #22 (permalink) Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:46 am   I would have went
 

Hi Alan,

This is very interesting. Would you classify this construction as correct English? I mean after all it's a different kind of condictional from the standard version we are being taught by our English teachers?
Spearhead
You can meet me at english-test.net


Joined: 19 Oct 2005
Posts: 52
Location: Oslo

Went #23 (permalink) Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:56 am   Went
 

Hi Spearhead,

That's a huge question asking me if I think it's correct English! All I can say is it's common in Scottish English in a slang way. I wouldn't use it and I wouldn't recommend it under the heading of standard English but then I think you have to allow that there are variations of English all over the world.

Alan
_________________
English as a Foreign Language
You can read my EFL story Progressive Forms
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16523
Location: UK

How many tenses in your language? #24 (permalink) Fri Jan 20, 2006 2:22 am   How many tenses in your language?
 

Many people in the US also say would have went, should have went, etc. There are very few features of American colloquial dialects that didn't originate in some British dialect or other, and all of these features are centuries old.

Like Alan, I also wouldn't consider it to be standard English, and in parts of America where it is used, teachers try to get children to stop using them.

The thing about the tenses in African American Vernacular English is that many of them don't have any equivalent in standard English and have to be translated with long phrases or sentences. While "would have went" can simply be converted to "would have gone", some of these AAVE tenses represent time concepts that don't exist at all in the standard English language. These African American tenses are also centuries old, by the way.
Jamie (K)
Guest





Latin correction #25 (permalink) Tue May 23, 2006 8:52 am   Latin correction
 

Hi! I'm currently at Uni to become a Latin instructor, so I thought I would correct something I saw on the first page.

Latin only has six(6) tenses. Present, imperfect, future, perfect, pluperfect and future perfect. The tenses are grouped either in "continuous" (present system)or "completed" (perfect system) aspect. Present, imperfect and future tense verbs are all "continuous" because the actions they describe are in the process of happening. Perfect, pluperfect and future perfect verbs are "complete" because the action of the verb has been completed.

Each verb also has person, number, mood and voice. That may be where the confusion over the number of tenses came from.

Person is who is doing the speaking (I/we = 1st, you/you = 2nd, s/he/it/they = 3rd).

Number is whether the speaker is singular or plural.

Mood is how the speaker treats the action of the verb. There are three of them: indicative, imperative and subjunctive. Indicative treats the action as a fact, while imperative mood treats it as a command and subjunctive mood treats it as an idea or a wish. People screw up the subjunctive in English all the time, and I don't blame them. It isn't fun in either language!

Voice is what the relationship is between the subject of the clause and the verb. There are three, though honestly, I have only ever seen Middle voice twice in Latin. It's more common in ancient Greek. Active and Passive are the other two. Active voice is used when the subject performs the action (The boy flies the kite.), while Passive voice is used when the subject receives the action (The kite is flown by the boy.) Middle voice shows a subject performing an action to itself or for its own interest.

Latin is a very verb heavy language, so if anybody is thinking about learning it, be prepared to bury your nose in a book and memorize endless strings of information.
Surelen
New Member


Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 1
Location: New England

Tenses #26 (permalink) Tue May 23, 2006 9:05 am   Tenses
 

Hi Surelen,

You said:

Quote:
Hi! I'm currently at Uni to become a Latin instructor, so I thought I would correct something I saw on the first page.


What was it on the first page you saw and wanted to correct?

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Passive Voice
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16523
Location: UK

Ukrainian vs. Russian #27 (permalink) Sat May 27, 2006 16:24 pm   Ukrainian vs. Russian
 

Jamie (K) wrote:
Are the two languages really alike?

The police in Moscow stopped a Ukrainian man on the street. They angrily asked him, "Kak vasha familia?" He answered, "Ocheny khorosho! Mama zdorovaya, Papa tozhe! Yak vasha?"


Well Jamie, that Ukrainian was just playing a joke on those policemen. Almost every citizen in the Soviet Union used to speak Russian which was the state language. Russian was the language in schools, universities, public administrations, at work, you name it. It is true that a lot of citizens from the former Soviet Union also spoke another language, especially if they came from the Baltic states or the Caucasian region. However, it's very unlikely that a Ukrainian would not know that "Kak vasha familia?" means What is your surname? even if his mother tongue was Ukrainian and not Russian.

TOEIC listening, talks: Discussing a new office layout
Torsten
Learning Coach
Torsten Daerr

Joined: 25 Sep 2003
Posts: 17344
Location: EU

Display posts from previous:   
Flags to symbolize languages? | Language students who fight
ESL Forums | What do you want to talk about? All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
Telling music apartWhitsun and Pentecost?What are your ideas toward criticism?Translating humorWhat is the short way to learn quickly and speak fluently?How does stress affect you?Anyone ever used a Dyson vacuum cleaner?Avoiding correct wordsNew kind of creature?What's more important - love or custom?Dogs (idioms and expressions)Enjoy english studyDo you find Michael Jackson difficult to understand?

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail