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Is there any difference between book and reserve?



 
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Is there any difference between book and reserve? #1 (permalink) Fri Jan 08, 2010 18:03 pm   Is there any difference between book and reserve?
 

Hi There.

Is there any difference between book and reserve?

Thanks for you .
Hussam Alashqar
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Joined: 19 Oct 2009
Posts: 6

Is there any difference between book and reserve? #2 (permalink) Fri Jan 08, 2010 18:22 pm   Is there any difference between book and reserve?
 

The words "reserve" and "book" have many meanings depending on the context they're used in. But, when they mean: arrange for and reserve (something for someone else) in advance, there's no difference in the meaning.

I hope this answers your question.

CHeeRz
Chiquitita
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Is there any difference between book and reserve? #3 (permalink) Fri Jan 08, 2010 18:30 pm   Is there any difference between book and reserve?
 

Thanks a lot for your quick response but in another forum I found this :

'book' indicates that something has been confirmed and paid for, whereas 'reserve' is less definite - you can make a reservation with a small deposit or with no deposit.

For example, in respect to a holiday, a person can reserve a hotel for a small amount, however the holiday is not confirmed until a further partial or full payment is received, at which point the holiday is booked and confirmed.

That said however, it really depends on the context of the situation, as if I was calling a restaurant I would probably ask to book a table rather than make a reservation.
Hussam Alashqar
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Joined: 19 Oct 2009
Posts: 6

Is there any difference between book and reserve? #4 (permalink) Fri Jan 08, 2010 18:42 pm   Is there any difference between book and reserve?
 

Well, as far as I know, they both mean the same thing in this context regardless of "payment".

thefreedictionary.com defines "to book" as, and I'm quoting, "To arrange for (tickets or lodgings, for example) in advance; reserve."
I believe you can actually "reserve" a table.

Thanks for sharing.

CHeeRz
Chiquitita
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yes it is: #5 (permalink) Tue Jan 12, 2010 10:59 am   yes it is:
 

Hi,

Yes their is difference between book and reserve.

Book-to register something

Reserve- Something kept back or saved for future use or a special purpose

Thanks
Nitikasnv3
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Joined: 09 Jan 2010
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Is there any difference between book and reserve? #6 (permalink) Tue Jan 12, 2010 11:05 am   Is there any difference between book and reserve?
 

We booked a room some years ago, it didn't suppose any payment.
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Is there any difference between book and reserve? #7 (permalink) Wed Jan 13, 2010 15:15 pm   Is there any difference between book and reserve?
 

v. booked, book·ing, books
v.tr.
1. To list or register in or as if in a book.
2.
a. To record charges against (a person) on a police blotter.
b. Sports To record the flagrant fouls of (a player) for possible disciplinary action, as in soccer.
3. To arrange for (tickets or lodgings, for example) in advance; reserve.
4. To hire or engage: The manager booked a magic show for Saturday night.
5. To allocate time for.

re·serve (r-zûrv)
tr.v. re·served, re·serv·ing, re·serves
1. To keep back, as for future use or for a special purpose.
2. To set or cause to be set apart for a particular person or use. See Synonyms at book.3. To keep or secure for oneself; retain: I reserve the right to disagree. See Synonyms at keep.

(thefreedictionary.com)

___________________________
reserve verb
/rɪˈzɜːv//-ˈzɝːv/ v [T]
• to keep something for a particular purpose or time
I reserve Mondays for tidying my desk and answering letters.
These seats are reserved for the elderly and women with babies.
I reserve judgment on this issue (= I won't give an opinion on it now) until we have more information.
If you reserve something such as a seat on an aircraft or a table at a restaurant, you arrange for it to be kept for your use
I reserved a double room at the Lamb Hotel.
[+ two objects] If you get there early, reserve me a seat/reserve a seat for me.

book verb (ARRANGE)
/bʊk/ v
[I or T] to arrange to have a seat, room, performer, etc. at a particular time in the future [+ two objects] I've booked us two tickets to see 'Carmen'/I've booked two tickets for us to see 'Carmen'.
She'd booked a table for four at their favourite restaurant.
Will booked a seat on the evening flight to Edinburgh.
We were advised to book early if we wanted to get a room.
They booked a jazz band for their wedding.
The hotel/restaurant/theatre is fully booked (up) (= all the rooms/tables/tickets have been taken).
I'd like to go but I'm afraid I'm booked up (= I have arranged to do other things) until the weekend.
(dictionary.cambridge.org)

CHeeRz,
Chiquitita
(Nonnative English Speaker)
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Is there any difference between book and reserve? #8 (permalink) Thu Jan 14, 2010 14:19 pm   Is there any difference between book and reserve?
 

In all my dictionaries they are given as synonyms :)
_________________
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Inga
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 21 Apr 2008
Posts: 279
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