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Definite vs. detached



 
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Definite vs. detached #1 (permalink) Sun Nov 13, 2005 1:33 am   Definite vs. detached
 

Test No. incompl/advan-89 "Verbal Learning", question 4

The judge has to adopt a ......... view of the crime by being utterly impartial.

(a) detracted
(b) detached
(c) definite
(d) defended

Test No. incompl/advan-89 "Verbal Learning", answer 4

The judge has to adopt a detached view of the crime by being utterly impartial.

Correct answer: (b) detached
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definite vs. detached

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Definite vs. detached #2 (permalink) Sun Nov 13, 2005 2:00 am   Definite vs. detached
 

.
The answer is detached, not definite. The sentence clue is 'by being impartial'-- detached means impartial in the judicial sense.
.
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