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Invitation vs. invite



 
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Invitation vs. invite #1 (permalink) Tue Nov 22, 2005 23:02 pm   Invitation vs. invite
 

Hi, what is the difference between an invite and an invitation? Is is correct so say Thank you for the invite or Thank you for the invitation?
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Invitation vs. invite #2 (permalink) Tue Nov 22, 2005 23:31 pm   Invitation vs. invite
 

http://yahooligans.yahoo.com/reference/dictionary/entry/invite

Invite, as a noun, is informal.

I never use it as a noun; it doesn't sound correct to me.

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Cesar
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