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Laying vs. Lying



 
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How is the pattern of comparative degree? | Why do we not use solitary here?
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Laying vs. Lying #1 (permalink) Thu Apr 01, 2010 22:20 pm   Laying vs. Lying
 

Hi,
What are the differences between Laying vs. Lying? Can you pleas explain the differences with some examples? How can I use them appropriately in a sentence?

Many thanks.

-Salivan
Pasban110
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Laying vs. Lying #2 (permalink) Thu Apr 01, 2010 23:22 pm   Laying vs. Lying
 

I don't think this is confusing words. Lying is the present participle of lie and laying is of lay. For example, he's lying(not tell the truth), he's lying in his bed, they're laying the table, the chickens have just laid their eggs. Sometimes you should also take care about whether it's transitive or intransitive verb. In this situation, lay, to some extent, is a transitive verb and lie is vice versa.
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Laying vs. Lying #3 (permalink) Fri Apr 02, 2010 9:52 am   Laying vs. Lying
 

Here's the difference:
To lie means to rest, recline, be situated.
You lie on a bed, rest there, Recline on it.
To lay means to put, place, set.
You lay a book on a table, put or set it there;
You lay your head on a pillow, place it on the pillow.
Whatever you can put down you can also lay down. You can lay something down, but you can't lay down, rest, recline. You can lie down, but you can’t lie something down. That's simple, right?
Now, here's where it gets a bit tricky.
The past tense of lie is lay: “Last night I lay in bed.” It is wrong to say that you laid in bed, because laid is the past tense of the verb to lay, which means to put, place. You wouldn't say “Last night I put in bed,” would you?
(If you laid in bed last night, you are a chicken.)
Here's how the tenses break down for the verb to lay (put, place):
You lay a book down today; you laid it down yesterday; and you have laid it down anytime in the past.
Here's how the tenses break down for the verb to lie (rest, recline):
When you're tired you lie down; when you were tired yesterday you lay down; and when you have been tired in the past you have lain down. (Lain is always preceded by have or had.)
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Laying vs. Lying #4 (permalink) Fri Apr 02, 2010 15:07 pm   Laying vs. Lying
 

Thank you the Nerd for your reply. I think I got the idea.

-Salivan
Pasban110
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Joined: 31 Aug 2009
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Location: Tabriz city, Iran

Laying vs. Lying #5 (permalink) Fri Apr 02, 2010 15:51 pm   Laying vs. Lying
 

Also lie lied lied for not telling the truth meaning.
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Laying vs. Lying #6 (permalink) Fri Apr 02, 2010 16:01 pm   Laying vs. Lying
 

Thank you Wanderer.
Pasban110
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