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to acquire; to earn; to purchase; to obtain; to profit
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English idiom: to pay a visit



 
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English idiom: to pay a visit #1 (permalink) Mon Dec 12, 2005 5:42 am   English idiom: to pay a visit
 

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #100 "The Parliamentary Candidate (3)", question 6

At eleven o'clock he ......... a brief visit to a public house on the estate. Henry couldn't offer to buy anyone a drink because he knew very well that his opponents would consider that to be dishonest. So he let one of his supporters buy him a drink instead.

(a) bought
(b) paid
(c) sought
(d) did

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #100 "The Parliamentary Candidate (3)", answer 6

At eleven o'clock he paid a brief visit to a public house on the estate. Henry couldn't offer to buy anyone a drink because he knew very well that his opponents would consider that to be dishonest. So he let one of his supporters buy him a drink instead.

Correct answer: (b) paid

Your answer was: incorrect
At eleven o'clock he did a brief visit to a public house on the estate. Henry couldn't offer to buy anyone a drink because he knew very well that his opponents would consider that to be dishonest. So he let one of his supporters buy him a drink instead.
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Hi Alan
What does it mean ' paid a brief visit' ? Is it an idiom ?
Can u explain to me ?

Thank you

Kelly
Kelly
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Idiom: to pay a visit #2 (permalink) Mon Dec 12, 2005 9:42 am   Idiom: to pay a visit
 

Hi Kelly,

Pay a visit is an accepted expression - meaning make a visit or simply visit.

Alan
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What is dishonest? #3 (permalink) Fri Nov 09, 2012 6:37 am   What is dishonest?
 

Hi teachers,

I'm sorry I'm not a big specialist in politics and hope you satisfy my curiosity. I can't see what would be dishonest in the election campaign if Henry offered to buy anyone a drink?

Thank you,
Vladimir.
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English idiom: to pay a visit #4 (permalink) Fri Nov 09, 2012 8:14 am   English idiom: to pay a visit
 

It wpi;d be seen as a mild form of bribery by his opponents. They could say he was attempting to buy their favour.
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The opposite meaning! #5 (permalink) Fri Nov 09, 2012 9:36 am   The opposite meaning!
 

Thank you Beeesneees,

Now I've caught it!!!
The complexity of my comprehention was in the "direction of buying".
I've decided for some reason that Henry offered to buy a drink for him.
But the sentence have the opposite meaning when Henry offered to buy a drink for anyone. (is it grammaticallly correct?)

So, I would be grateful if you explain me how to express the opposite meaning in both cases? And does the original sentence have two interpretations?

Many many, many thanks,
Vladimir.
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English idiom: to pay a visit #6 (permalink) Fri Nov 09, 2012 19:08 pm   English idiom: to pay a visit
 

Henry offered to but a drink.
Someone offered to buy Henry a drink.

The original sentence only has one interpretation.
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Various meanings #7 (permalink) Mon Nov 12, 2012 7:17 am   Various meanings
 

Hi Beeesneees,

Now I know that if Henry offers something to others and Henry do it, it sounds like (in the Past):
Henry offered to buy a drink.

When someone offers Henry to do something it sounds like (in the Past):
Someone offered to buy Henry a drink.

So, how to say that someone offers to do something for Henry?
Someone offered to buy a drink for Henry. Is it correct?

After the next reply of Beeesneees:
Someone offered to buy for Henry a drink.

Thanks a lot,
Vladimir.
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English idiom: to pay a visit #8 (permalink) Mon Nov 12, 2012 7:45 am   English idiom: to pay a visit
 

It's okay, yes. I'd prefer putting 'Henry' first though.
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