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'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance'



 
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'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance' #1 (permalink) Wed Jun 09, 2010 7:39 am   'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance'
 

Are the following two sentences correct?
Is there any difference between them:

1. Your attendance at the meeting is of the utmost importance
2. Your attendance at the meeting is of utmost importance

Thanks!
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'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance' #2 (permalink) Wed Jun 09, 2010 7:45 am   'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance'
 

They mean the same thing. Use with the article seems far more prevalent. Your sentences would be correct if you had punctuated them with periods.
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'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance' #3 (permalink) Wed Jun 09, 2010 7:45 am   'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance'
 

There is no difference in meaning but the infinitive would normally be used in this context.

It's not just important... it is of the greatest extent or amount of importance.
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'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance' #4 (permalink) Wed Jun 09, 2010 7:47 am   'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance'
 

Bees, why do you say the infinitive would normally be used here?
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'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance' #5 (permalink) Wed Jun 09, 2010 7:51 am   'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance'
 

Hi Bev,

You've lost me here -

Quote:
There is no difference in meaning but the infinitive would normally be used in this context.


Hi Tort,

As always the use of the definite article here simply strengthens the sense of 'importance''. I would definitely use 'the' but there is no problem with the correctness of either.

Alan
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'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance' #6 (permalink) Wed Jun 09, 2010 8:02 am   'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance'
 

Mordant wrote:
Bees, why do you say the infinitive would normally be used here?


Because although my body has been up and about for a couple of hours, it seems my brain hasn't yet decided to rise! My only excuse is I was talking to someone about a rather shocking newspaper article (a local hero meeting an untimely death) when I wrote the answer.

Alan - I'm not surprised I lost you. I lost myself too.
I think I'm losing my marbles. That will teach me to try multi-tasking.

What I meant to write was:
There is no difference in meaning but 'the' would normally be used in this context.
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'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance' #7 (permalink) Wed Jun 09, 2010 8:03 am   'of utmost importance' vs. 'of the utmost importance'
 

Thank you all for your valuable comments!
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utmost the utmost #8 (permalink) Sun Jul 15, 2012 11:32 am   utmost the utmost
 

I would say the is required because utmost is a superlative - like greatest, best...
However, sometimes even words like best are used as simple adjectives. Consider come to our shop for best buys. and so on. This is perhaps why if you look at Google, utmost importance is much more common than the utmost importance. Of course, all these people are wrong, but what can you do about it?
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