Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
something or someone that does not match up to standards; object of lower quality; outcast
reject
divide
scanner
doubt
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Foiled again!



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
most/bast/least | as big and as blue as
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
Foiled again! #1 (permalink) Fri Jan 06, 2006 10:04 am   Foiled again!
 

What's the meaning of "Foiled again!"
Elf
Guest





Foiled again #2 (permalink) Fri Jan 06, 2006 11:02 am   Foiled again
 

Hi Elf,

This means once more you have been tricked/deceived.

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16390
Location: UK

Learn all about English adverbs in this amusing storyEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Read these English anecdotes and maybe smile today? Subscribe to free email English course
Foiled again! #3 (permalink) Wed Nov 23, 2011 10:25 am   Foiled again!
 

I'm sorry, Alan, especially given that you're a co-founder, but that is part of an expression made famous by a character, Dastardly Dan, with a varied history on television, with an opposite connotation.

Dastardly Dan himself was a villain noted for his trickery and deceit. The hero would thwart (esl guys, prevent, stop) Dastardly Dan's clever little ruses, at which point he would exclaim 'Curses. Foiled again." To restate, rather than mean a person has himself been tricked again, it means a person has been interrupted or stopped in the attempt to do so to another person. It really carries the association that the person saying it was the villain, not the victim.

(This is my first post here. My cred's: I had the highest verbal scores ever in my grad school, sky-high Miller Analogies, and am reasonably competent with the English language. I'm getting older, and I am aware that I've acquired a lot of misconceptions over usage along the way, when, rather than research immediately, I tried to determine via context--which is likely the root of a lot of malapropisms, etc for many. Luckily, for the most part I've double-checked, and at this point in life, triple-check. Also luckily, I've studied Latin, Classical Greek, French, and speak some Spanish, so I have a good sense of the 'roots of words--etymology.

I am, however, a terrible typist, so I'll try to check for typo's. I am also commited to accuracy, as clear communication is dependent on a shared understanding of meaning, which is what prompted my joining this group. I hope I can be of some use, as well as being prompted to explore areas that are unclear to me, as well.)
VerballyCompetent
New Member


Joined: 23 Nov 2011
Posts: 2

Foiled again! #4 (permalink) Wed Nov 23, 2011 10:35 am   Foiled again!
 

Hi,

Welcome to the forum. No need to apologise. You have added some useful information. On reflection your explanation stands up better than mine and I think 'thwarted' is a good synonym. Look forward to hearing from you again.

Alan
_________________
English as a Foreign Language
You can read my EFL story Progressive Forms
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16390
Location: UK

Foiled again! #5 (permalink) Wed Nov 23, 2011 11:32 am   Foiled again!
 

Thank you very much, Alan, for your warm welcome. I'm sure you have a huge amount of members, but, on the chance that you are able to remember me: I appreciate those who are more interested in approaching truth than maintaining their egos. That you've just demonstrated, and I take much the same approach. I'm hoping to start writing in earnest and have a huge amount to learn about the process. This is a great place to reassess usage a person has taken for granted. I had a Mexican friend say to me, on seeing a billboard sign 'oh, Buggle Boy' for Bugle Boy. I had never studied English pronunciation much, but I wanted to see if there was a general rule that would help him. In the process I learned the general rule about long or short vowels preceding single or double consonants. It's since been a help when I forget spelling or learn new words--except for the drat exceptions scampering all over the language, too fast to be swatted down.

It's late here--2:20 am, and I'm about to turn in, but I was wondering if the differences in the local usage in the UK v. the US presents many problems here? If there's a ready answer here, please excuse my laziness. I'm very tired and have some injuries making it difficult to type. Also, is it a help for the ESL students if posts are typed in a formally correct manner? (I just did the lazy 'am', an accomplishment as I've been so overly precise I'm starting to feel like a anachronism.

Thank you in advance. I am flagging...

Kathy Coe
VerballyCompetent
New Member


Joined: 23 Nov 2011
Posts: 2

Foiled again! #6 (permalink) Wed Nov 23, 2011 13:31 pm   Foiled again!
 

Please activate Javascript in your browser to listen to this audio recording

 17 Listened
Download mp3 Click to listen

Hi Kathy,

Don't worry about being formal or informal. Just be yourself. We get the occasional spat along the lines of: You say tomato, I say tomato. But that sort of thing doesn't last long. Tell us more about yourself.

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Passive Voice
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16390
Location: UK

Display posts from previous:   
most/bast/least | as big and as blue as
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on English Forums
PrepositionsIs/Are, Figure out and Find outHad/ Would haveAmerican Idioms:Write a diaryexpect vs waithelp me with my questionscode oneclimbin advance of vs precedingwill/going to/or Present Continuous ???whinesomething in negative questions.

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail