Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
to give assignments; to overburden; to strain
distinguish
overlap
task
unveil
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

double prepositions



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Please help me correct this paragraph | It would have been nice if someone told me about it or it would have been...
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
double prepositions #1 (permalink) Tue Sep 07, 2010 12:38 pm   double prepositions
 

I am a native english speaker and have recently moved to another native speaking area however this area seems to have its own form of english and many things here I question or just sound awkward to me.

Commonly prepositions are doubled for example "The remote is in on the couch.", "The car is up in the driveway", or "The beer is over in the fridge." What is grammatically happening here when a double preposition is used? Is there an assumed part missing for example "The remote is in the room on the couch." or is using a double preposition correct?

[corrected errors]
DamianWarS
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 04 Sep 2010
Posts: 15

double prepositions #2 (permalink) Tue Sep 07, 2010 13:11 pm   double prepositions
 

Hello. Damian, you really should use correct capitalization. Also, the possessive form is "its." I assume you know that, but I point it out for those who may be confused. Also, "however" should be preceded by a semicolon and followed by a comma.

"The remote is in on the couch" is rather odd. I would not consider it grammatically correct or sensible, but I don't know what is going on where you are. Maybe it's part of some sort of dialect.

"The car is up in the driveway" sounds like informal English to me. I know what it means. "Up" is useless. "It rolled up under the couch."

"The beer is over in the fridge" sounds odd, but "He's over in the next town" doesn't. Again, it's quite informal and conversational, though.

There are times when double prepositions are correct or even necessary. "He was in on the conspiracy." Of course that is idiomatic. "Off of" is hated, but it enjoys a fair amount of use in informal spoken American English.
Mordant
Language Coach


Joined: 12 May 2010
Posts: 1964
Location: United States

In this story you'll learn how to use the English articlesEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Here is all you want to know about English! Click to subscribe to free email English course
double prepositions #3 (permalink) Tue Sep 07, 2010 14:52 pm   double prepositions
 

When it comes to dialect where do we draw the line. Does grammar morph into what is predominately spoken in a culture?
DamianWarS
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 04 Sep 2010
Posts: 15

Display posts from previous:   
Please help me correct this paragraph | It would have been nice if someone told me about it or it would have been...
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on English Forums
Label parts of speechis there any difference between tell and say?Compound nouns!help somebody grieve a lossWhat does 'Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.' mean?alive/living/lifeArticles againCan you please check this sales copy?feeble=weakmeaning of 'beyond' in this contextfinish vs endCould you please help me correct this essay?Which choice is correct

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail