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"present tense" vs. "past tense"



 
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"present tense" vs. "past tense" #1 (permalink) Sun Feb 05, 2006 9:10 am   "present tense" vs. "past tense"
 

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #121 "English Grammar Tenses", question 5

I assumed you ......... paying for the repairs until the end of last year.

(a) have been
(b) was been
(c) are being
(d) had been

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #121 "English Grammar Tenses", answer 5

I assumed you had been paying for the repairs until the end of last year.

Correct answer: (d) had been
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is this a present tense or past tense?

Gella
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Past perfect continuous #2 (permalink) Sun Feb 05, 2006 9:16 am   Past perfect continuous
 

Dear learner,
This is past perfect continuous tense - had been doing sth.
Daniela
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Tenses #3 (permalink) Sun Feb 05, 2006 11:10 am   Tenses
 

Hi English Learner,

In this sentence:

Quote:
I assumed you had been paying for the repairs until the end of last year.
you can see an example of the sequence of tenses at work.

I assumed is Past Simple and you had been paying is the Past Perfect (continuous). The Past Perfect refers to a time in the past that came before the main verb assumed in the Past Simple.

Alan
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What is the principal word here? #4 (permalink) Tue Nov 20, 2012 6:30 am   What is the principal word here?
 

Hi Alan, Teachers,

Is the use of Past Perfect (continuous) defined by the 'until the end of last year' in this sentence?

Thank you,
Vladimir.
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Wanted an answer! #5 (permalink) Wed Nov 21, 2012 8:09 am   Wanted an answer!
 

Dear Teachers,

I've posted my previous comment on this topic as as I know from my the English learning Past Perfect is used due to the sign of the time which is 'until the end of last year' here. Am I right?

But the reply of Alan explains that use of Past Perfect is defined by the verb 'assumed' to indicate the order of actions. I feel he is right and having my humble experience in English I agree with him, but have some doubts about it. Help me, please!

The question is What is the initial cause of using Past Perfect here?
What are the matters in fact?

Thank you very much,
Vladimir.
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"present tense" vs. "past tense" #6 (permalink) Wed Nov 21, 2012 8:33 am   "present tense" vs. "past tense"
 

Hi Vladimir,

Quote:
I assumed you had been paying for the repairs until the end of last year.


The reason for the past perfect in that sentence is as follows:

The whole sentence refers to the past. 'I assumed' means that this was my assumption referring to something that happened before I made that assumption. In order to express the time sequence you need two types of past 'I assumed; (past simple) and 'had been paying' (past perfect). The time phrase 'until the end of last year' is linked to the past perfect tense because it is also prior to 'my assumption'.

Alan.
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Is the new sentence correct? #7 (permalink) Wed Nov 21, 2012 8:52 am   Is the new sentence correct?
 

Hi Alan,

Thank you for your reply!
Well, now I know that the main reason of for using Past Perfect is the intention to express the order of events with relation to the time and the mentioning of the time in a sentence is the formal and is needed to mark the time only.

As a result of all these conclusions is my variant of the sentence without marking the time:

I assumed you had been paying for the repairs.

Is this correct?

Thank you once more,
Vladimir.
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"present tense" vs. "past tense" #8 (permalink) Wed Nov 21, 2012 9:30 am   "present tense" vs. "past tense"
 

Yes, the two tenses themselves indicate the different times even though there isn't a time expression shown in you sentence.

Note: the reason for
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