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When do we use the plural of 'money' (monies)?



 
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When do we use the plural of 'money' (monies)? #1 (permalink) Mon Feb 27, 2006 22:41 pm   When do we use the plural of 'money' (monies)?
 

Hi, when do we use the plural of money (monies)? I have seen this word sometimes but it looks and sounds strange to me (which doesn't really mean that much, actually). As far as I understand, the plural of money is used in official documents? Thank you for any comments on this topic.
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Monies? #2 (permalink) Tue Feb 28, 2006 3:58 am   Monies?
 

This word "monies" is used in financial contexts, and it sounds very strange and bureaucratic even to the ears of some native speakers. I've never been able to figure out for sure why they make it plural. I think that when they use it they are often talking about money from various accounts or funds. However, I think some writers use it just to sound "important".
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Money #3 (permalink) Tue Feb 28, 2006 9:43 am   Money
 

Hi Olaf,

Just to add another comment on this word - it is often used to describe the different pots of/sums of money collected by charities when they list the amounts that have come in from different sources. To me it has a slightly quaint and oldfashioned flavour. You could say it gives money an air of respectability in contrast to that other expression filthy lucre.

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