Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
meanwhile; in the meantime
twice
already
overhead
interim
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Born-----present tense



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
at the crossroad vs. at the crossroads | hello
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
Born-----present tense #1 (permalink) Fri Dec 03, 2010 9:26 am   Born-----present tense
 

I wanted to know what form of "born" should be used in this sentence


I always wanted to.........(born) in USA.

_________________
I like this very much :-)
Imsriram
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 24 Jul 2010
Posts: 373

Born-----present tense #2 (permalink) Fri Dec 03, 2010 10:04 am   Born-----present tense
 

Hi,

You would need the passive infinitive 'be born'.

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16390
Location: UK

Do you know how to use the relative pronoun?English grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!How many different ways with words do you know? Subscribe to free email English course
Born-----present tense #3 (permalink) Sat Dec 04, 2010 17:12 pm   Born-----present tense
 

In general what is the present tense for "born"?
_________________
I like this very much :-)
Imsriram
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 24 Jul 2010
Posts: 373

Born-----present tense #4 (permalink) Sat Dec 04, 2010 18:29 pm   Born-----present tense
 

Hi,

Let's start at the beginning. The active form is the verb 'bear' meaning broadly 'carry' as in 'bear a heavy weight' 'bear a great responsibility'. The past is 'bore' and the past participle is 'borne'. The other specific use means 'give birth to'. It tends to be used in past tenses with that meaning as in: The wife of Charles Dickens bore him 10 children. She's borne him 10 children. If you wanted to use the present tense, you would say: During the early years of their marriage Catherine Dickens bears him one child almost each year. When we want to refer to the act of coming to life, we use the passive and then the past participle has a different spelling as in: She was born in France.

Alan
_________________
English as a Foreign Language
You can read my EFL story Progressive Forms
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16390
Location: UK

Born-----present tense #5 (permalink) Sat Dec 04, 2010 18:34 pm   Born-----present tense
 

Thank you! But could you explain why people say give birth to one calf rather than give birth one calf?
And...please, what is the difference between other than and rather than?
_________________
Rolling stone gathers no moss.
Bookaholic_English
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 17 Sep 2010
Posts: 578

Born-----present tense #6 (permalink) Sun Dec 05, 2010 7:12 am   Born-----present tense
 

I'll take "other than" vs. "rather than"

Rather than:
- We should walk rather than drive.
- Rather than pizza, I think I'll order steak.
- I would rather live than die.

--> With "rather than", you are choosing one thing instead of another or showing preference for one thing over another.

Other than:
- There is no use for this fruitcake other than as a brick.
- There is nothing wrong with you, other than the fact that your breath stinks.

I think of "other than" as being generally synonymous with "aside from".
_________________
Billie Jean is not my lover. Hee.
Prezbucky
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 2625
Location: Nashville, TN (USA)

Born-----present tense #7 (permalink) Sun Dec 05, 2010 8:23 am   Born-----present tense
 

Thank you!
_________________
Rolling stone gathers no moss.
Bookaholic_English
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 17 Sep 2010
Posts: 578

Display posts from previous:   
at the crossroad vs. at the crossroads | hello
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
their childUse of "sell"everything has changed or everything is changed?Taking to the airwaves ?Difference betweenAnother description of a chart.A long subjectMain or Leading Characters vs.toned down letter to neighbourSometime/Sometimesminute's or minuteWhat do you mean by this sentence?without intervening and assisting

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail