Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
to plan; to design; to imagine; to conceive; to envision
conceptualize
use
box
balance
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Abandon vs. leave



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
What is the difference between 'much better' and 'more better' | Meaning of detached
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
Abandon vs. leave #1 (permalink) Wed Mar 08, 2006 2:35 am   Abandon vs. leave
 

English Synonym, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #62 "Synonyms for quit", question 8

He easily ......... his career.

(a) left
(b) departed
(c) abandoned
(d) stopped

English Synonym, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #62 "Synonyms for quit", answer 8

He easily abandoned his career.

Correct answer: (c) abandoned

Your answer was: incorrect
He easily left his career.
_________________________

Hi!
Why is abadoned is better then left? Please, explain it.
thank you
sincerelly,
anna
Anna99
New Member


Joined: 03 Mar 2006
Posts: 1

Abandon vs leave #2 (permalink) Wed Mar 08, 2006 9:32 am   Abandon vs leave
 

Hi Anna99,
In this particular example "abandon" is more appropriate because it refers to the idea of giving up something important or significant (such as a career). It also implies previous responsibility for something (or someone) and has an emotional colouring whereas "leave" lacks this emotional colouring.
Daniela
_________________
English Language Learning Online
Learn English with Daniela
Daniela
Language Coach
Daniela Encheva

Joined: 06 Dec 2005
Posts: 150
Location: Bulgaria

Learn to use the present simple with the help of this short storyEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!This newsletter tells you all about English! Subscribe to free email English course
Abandon vs. leave #3 (permalink) Sun Nov 09, 2008 7:32 am   Abandon vs. leave
 

i just wonder can we say: " never to abandon, never to give up"
Athenaxcy
New Member


Joined: 09 Nov 2008
Posts: 6

Abandon vs. leave #4 (permalink) Sun Nov 09, 2008 8:45 am   Abandon vs. leave
 

Hi,

That depends on the rest of the sentence. If you have a main verb in the sentence you could say: They wanted never to abandon/never to give up. On their own your two phrases could be considered as imperatives (orders) in which case you would say: never abandon/never give up. The third possibility is to make these two phrases subjects of a sentence as in: Never to abandon/give up is the characteristic of an optimistic person.

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16388
Location: UK

Abandon vs. leave #5 (permalink) Sun Nov 09, 2008 10:56 am   Abandon vs. leave
 

hi, Alan

thank you for your answer.

the whole sentence is: Although different people have different opinions about American Dream, for me it is never to abandon, never to give up.

Is this sentence acceptable?

Athena
Athenaxcy
New Member


Joined: 09 Nov 2008
Posts: 6

Abandon vs leave #6 (permalink) Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:55 am   Abandon vs leave
 

Daniela wrote:
Hi Anna99,
In this particular example "abandon" is more appropriate because it refers to the idea of giving up something important or significant (such as a career). It also implies previous responsibility for something (or someone) and has an emotional colouring whereas "leave" lacks this emotional colouring.
Daniela


Hi,
Thank you very much for your explanation on this confusion.

Regards
U F
Cilentcry
New Member


Joined: 28 Jul 2009
Posts: 3
Location: Pakistan

Abandon vs. leave #7 (permalink) Mon Mar 15, 2010 8:05 am   Abandon vs. leave
 

Hi,
kindly explain about Abandoned? He easily left his career.or He easily abandoned his career. What is the difference between Abandoned and left?
saikrishna
Saikrishna
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 05 Dec 2009
Posts: 27
Location: India

Abandon vs. leave #8 (permalink) Mon Mar 15, 2010 9:11 am   Abandon vs. leave
 

Hi,

Although both verbs suggest 'go away from', 'abandon' also indicates that you leave someone or something without any further interest or support. We use it in expressions like 'abandon hope' suggesting 'give up hope' or 'abandon your family and friends', which means you go away from them and leave them without help or support and have nothing more to do with them. In your example with 'career' the suggestion is that you give up that career and have no more to do with it.

Alan
_________________
English as a Foreign Language
You can read my EFL story Progressive Forms
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16388
Location: UK

Abandon vs. leave #9 (permalink) Mon Mar 15, 2010 23:39 pm   Abandon vs. leave
 

Thank you.
Puppet
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 02 Jan 2010
Posts: 549

Abandon vs. leave #10 (permalink) Wed Jul 28, 2010 10:07 am   Abandon vs. leave
 

Alan wrote:
Hi,

Although both verbs suggest 'go away from', 'abandon' also indicates that you leave someone or something without any further interest or support. We use it in expressions like 'abandon hope' suggesting 'give up hope' or 'abandon your family and friends', which means you go away from them and leave them without help or support and have nothing more to do with them. In your example with 'career' the suggestion is that you give up that career and have no more to do with it.

Alan


Thanks Alan Sir!
Sonia*
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 19 Aug 2009
Posts: 211

Display posts from previous:   
What is the difference between 'much better' and 'more better' | Meaning of detached
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on English Forums
What does pull over mean?What does adjusting to your new job mean in this sentence?What does 'catch a faint glimpse' mean?bothered vs. disturbedshow vs restrictMind vs. mineWhat are certain plants?I want to see if I am correct or not when filling in these blanks...I'm moving up in the company next week.like mowing the lawn?What are Christmas stockings?What does 'overheard' mean?I would like to know the meaning of regular basis?

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail