Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
to advance beyond proper limits; to infringe
augment
stall
promote
encroach
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Expression: Taking my hat off



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Difference between tour, expedition, outing, trip, excursion | Idioms: sink one's teeth into VERSUS get one's teeth into
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
Expression: Taking my hat off #1 (permalink) Sun Sep 19, 2004 17:11 pm   Expression: Taking my hat off
 

Test No. express/advan-5 "Call it a day", question 1

I take my hat off to all those people who worked hard to get the contract.

(a) respect
(b) encourage
(c) congratulate
(d) welcome

Test No. express/advan-5 "Call it a day", answer 1

I congratulate all those people who worked hard to get the contract.

Correct answer: (c) congratulate

Your answer was: incorrect
I respect all those people who worked hard to get the contract.

---------------------------------------------

Hi, I was wondering if you could help me to better understand the phrase 'taking my hat off', I used to think that it meant giving someone respect, ie. when a man takes of his hat in the church or when he takes off his hat infront of a lady..

thank you
Joe
Joe
Guest





Hats #2 (permalink) Sun Sep 19, 2004 23:23 pm   Hats
 

Hi,

You're quite right because you raise/take off your hat to someone in this sense to show admiration for the hard work they have done. You see someone do a very brave thing and you take your hat off to them to indicate that you are very impressed with what they have done.

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16667
Location: UK

Learn all about English adverbs in this amusing storyEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Have you read a good anecdote today? Subscribe to free email English course
Expression: Taking my hat off #3 (permalink) Tue Nov 07, 2006 3:50 am   Expression: Taking my hat off
 

Hi,

I chose the same as Joe. According to Alan's comment, it seems that both (a) and (c) are correct. Can I see it this way? But I'd like to know which is better or which one is the best answer in this situation.

haihao
Haihao
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Oct 2006
Posts: 2471
Location: Japan

Expression: Taking my hat off #4 (permalink) Tue Nov 07, 2006 6:49 am   Expression: Taking my hat off
 

You can respect and congratulate someone at the same time but congratulate is the correct answer here. You congratulate someone when they work hard and achieve their goal. ("worked hard to get the contract")

Taking your hat off can show respect but that is the literal meaning. In this question they are using the idiomatic meaning, and congratulate is the best answer.
Canadian45
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 08 Oct 2006
Posts: 651
Location: Canada

Expression: Taking my hat off #5 (permalink) Tue Nov 07, 2006 7:49 am   Expression: Taking my hat off
 

Hi Canadian45,

Thanks again. But may I be a little bit more straightforward with you even though I know it's imprudent?
Well, I think if there hadn't been '(a) respect' as a choice here, I would have chosen (c) as its best answer without hesitation. However, it is because (a) fits it literally that the literalness makes me feel much safer and surer to choose it. Can I make an 'objection' to your comment like this? (I'm kiddin') - haihao
Haihao
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Oct 2006
Posts: 2471
Location: Japan

Expression: Taking my hat off #6 (permalink) Tue Nov 07, 2006 9:58 am   Expression: Taking my hat off
 

Hi Haihao

I like "respect" as a solution, too. :D

But take your hat off to someone also means to praise someone's work or achievement, and because this is also a meaning for "congratulate", (c) works quite well in the context of the test question.

Amy
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

Expression: Taking my hat off #7 (permalink) Tue Nov 07, 2006 11:15 am   Expression: Taking my hat off
 

Hi Haihao,

I think I need to speak up here as this is one of my tests. I can understand the apparent discrepancy between respect and congraulation but I have added: 'who worked hard to get the contract' to suggest it's really someone saying to them: Well done and congratulations. It brings to mind a situation that occurs at the University of Oxford. When students have finshed their final examinations, they have to have some kind of interview where they meet their examiners. This interview can be an opportunity for a student to move up if they are on the borderline between the different classes or grades of the degree they are about to receive. If the student has been absolutely brilliant, all the examiners stand up and raise their mortar boards (academic head dress/cap). The reason for this is that the student has received what is called: A congratulatory First (first class degree). Sadly I have to confess that when it came to my turn, all the examiners remained seated.

A
_________________
English as a Foreign Language
You can read my EFL story Progressive Forms
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16667
Location: UK

Display posts from previous:   
Difference between tour, expedition, outing, trip, excursion | Idioms: sink one's teeth into VERSUS get one's teeth into
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
Expression: to be up for somethingIdiom: face the musicIn home versus at homeMeaning of 'non-refundable'Aren't the words 'early to bed, etc.' termed to be a phrase?Idiom: to live off one's payResource material for this battery of exercisesMeaning of "clammed up"Fantasize vs imagine'didn't have a bean' = 'had no money'?Expression: to wash the dishesWhat does tons mean?Idiom: hold your breath

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail