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Young Ones Of Animals



 
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ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Help me out: Doug's sisters are in Oregon and N.Y | Use of comma
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Young Ones Of Animals #1 (permalink) Sat May 20, 2006 18:42 pm   Young Ones Of Animals
 

Hi There,

I Would Love To Know If All Birds And Animals Have Their Young Ones With Their Spicific Names...

The -----------of A Crow(Is Fledgling Ok?)
The ----------------of A Sparrow
The ------------------of A Pigeon
The ----------------of A Parrot

The Crow Gave Birth To A--------------------(How Would We Say This One?)

Thanks

Jane And Jolly
Jane And Jolly
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Baby birds #2 (permalink) Sat May 20, 2006 20:01 pm   Baby birds
 

All baby birds are called chicks. Small birds not yet ready to leave the nest are nestlings. Those who are ready to fly from the nest are called fledglings. I donít know if all young birds have a name, but here are a few:

Crow: simp
Pigeon: squab
Eagle: eaglet
Falcon/hawk: eyas
Swan: cygnet
Duck: duckling
Chicken: cockerel
Hen: pullet
Conchita
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Young Ones Of Animals #3 (permalink) Sat May 20, 2006 20:29 pm   Young Ones Of Animals
 

THANK YOU A LOT CONCHITA FOR YOUR KIND ANSWER.

BUT COULD WE SAY?:

MY PIGEON HAS GIVEN BIRTH TO A SQUAB

AGAIN THANKS
TAKE CARE
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Young Ones Of Animals #4 (permalink) Sat May 20, 2006 21:37 pm   Young Ones Of Animals
 

Anonymous wrote:
BUT COULD WE SAY?:

MY PIGEON HAS GIVEN BIRTH TO A SQUAB


Hi Jane and Jolly

Personally, I would never say that a bird "gave birth to a" baby bird.

A bird first lays eggs. And the eggs later hatch.

Amy
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Baby birds #5 (permalink) Sat May 20, 2006 23:16 pm   Baby birds
 

Conchita wrote:
Crow: simp
Pigeon: squab
Eagle: eaglet
Falcon/hawk: eyas
Swan: cygnet
Duck: duckling
Chicken: cockerel
Hen: pullet

Honestly, Conchita, except for eaglet and duckling, I don't think any person walking down the street would know these words. A few might know cygnet. We just say they hatch baby birds, or chicks if it's a bird we think kindly about (not a crow). A lot of people would understand simp as an old word for a Soviet sympathizer.
Jamie (K)
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Baby birds #6 (permalink) Sat May 20, 2006 23:57 pm   Baby birds
 

Jamie (K) wrote:
Honestly, Conchita, except for eaglet and duckling, I don't think any person walking down the street would know these words. A few might know cygnet. We just say they hatch baby birds, or chicks if it's a bird we think kindly about (not a crow). A lot of people would understand simp as an old word for a Soviet sympathizer.

That's what I thought, too, Jamie. I hardly know them in my own languages, let alone in English! But, whether we know them or not, the fact remains that these words exist (I swear I didn't make them up :) !). If someone asks for them, why shouldn't I oblige them with the information I can find, especially if I can learn from it too?

I like the expression: a bird we think kindly about.
Conchita
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Joined: 26 Dec 2005
Posts: 2826
Location: Madrid, Spain

Baby birds #7 (permalink) Sun May 21, 2006 4:06 am   Baby birds
 

Conchita wrote:
If someone asks for them, why shouldn't I oblige them with the information I can find, especially if I can learn from it too?

You're right about that! Who knows? Someone may be writing a poem.

Conchita wrote:
I like the expression: a bird we think kindly about.

That was just my spontaneous turn of phrase. It is funny, come to think of it.
Jamie (K)
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Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 6758
Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

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