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Cave vs cave in



 
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Cave vs cave in #1 (permalink) Tue Feb 14, 2012 18:46 pm   Cave vs cave in
 

Hi,

Could you check the sentences below. Also, is there any difference between them, assuming that they have passed a grammar check?

1. The going had gotten tough for him, but he was not one to cave easily.
2. The going had gotten tough for him, but he was not one to cave in easily.

Thanks!

PS: sorry, I've posted the question in the wrong thread by mistake.
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Cave vs cave in #2 (permalink) Fri Feb 17, 2012 20:51 pm   Cave vs cave in
 

The verb 'to cave' means to explore caves underground. This sentence doesn't make sense.
'To cave in' means to give in or give up, which basically mean the same, so this sentence is correct.
The use of 'gotten' is American English, British English would say 'got'.
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Re: Cave vs cave in #3 (permalink) Fri Feb 17, 2012 22:56 pm   Re: Cave vs cave in
 

Our Tort System wrote:
1. The going had gotten tough for him, but he was not one to cave easily.
2. The going had gotten tough for him, but he was not one to cave in easily.
Hi Dean,

Both sentences are just fine.

My interpretation of each is as follows:

In sentence 1, the verb 'cave' seems more suggestive of 'give up' or 'stop trying to achieve/do something'.

In sentence 2, the use of 'cave in' tends to suggest to me that he might have been resisting agreement with someone else (or not allowing someone to do something) and he was unlikely to agree/relent/yield. (If he did cave in, it would be because it was too difficult for him to continue to disagree/not allow).

That's my personal reaction to your specific sentences. However, 'cave' and 'cave in' (meaning give up or yield) can generally be used interchangeably.

The verb 'cave' can be used with or without the word 'in', though I would guess that it is probably somewhat more common with 'in'.

---------------------------------------------

The verb 'to cave' can also be used to mean something similar to 'explore a cave'. However, I'd say people might tend to use the construction 'go caving' more often than just the verb 'cave'. Or you'll hear 'caving' used as an adjective ("They forgot to bring the caving gear, so we won't be able to go caving.")
.
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Cave vs cave in #4 (permalink) Sat Feb 18, 2012 6:03 am   Cave vs cave in
 

Hi Amy and Iowtrish,
Thanks for your input.

@Amy,

Thanks a lot for going into so much detail on my account! I really appreciate your effort.
Now I understand the difference. :)))
And nice to see you on the forum again, after a long hiatus.
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"He who tries to establish his point by much yelling shows that his reasoning is weak"
-Jodi Ann Arias
Our Tort System
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Joined: 24 May 2010
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Location: The big apple

Re: Cave vs cave in #5 (permalink) Wed Feb 22, 2012 16:24 pm   Re: Cave vs cave in
 

Yankee wrote:
The verb 'to cave' can also be used to mean something similar to 'explore a cave'. However, I'd say people might tend to use the construction 'go caving' more often than just the verb 'cave'. Or you'll hear 'caving' used as an adjective ("They forgot to bring the caving gear, so we won't be able to go caving.")
.


By the way, do you use the word "spelunking" too?
As in "he went spelunking".

Thanks!
_________________
"He who tries to establish his point by much yelling shows that his reasoning is weak"
-Jodi Ann Arias
Our Tort System
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 May 2010
Posts: 3886
Location: The big apple

Cave vs cave in #6 (permalink) Thu Feb 23, 2012 8:16 am   Cave vs cave in
 

Spelunking is certainly the word the experts use. It seems to suggest more than just exploring caves for fun.
Iowtrish
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Joined: 16 Feb 2012
Posts: 183
Location: Germany

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