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How to use up, off and out after a verb?



 
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How to use up, off and out after a verb? #1 (permalink) Thu Feb 23, 2012 20:44 pm   How to use up, off and out after a verb?
 

I got confusion about these issue. I got not a clear idea how these adverbs change the meaning of a verb and how to used them correctly

would you help me?

thanks in advance
Lovingruby
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How to use up, off and out after a verb? #2 (permalink) Fri Feb 24, 2012 1:21 am   How to use up, off and out after a verb?
 

Are you talking about phrasal verbs such as "call up", "call off" and "call out"? The meanings of these are often idiomatic and are not reliably predictable from the component parts. Certain patterns exist (for example, "up" can often denote something done thoroughly or completely, though not in "call up"!), and sometimes the connection is fairly obvious (for example "switching off the TV" puts the TV into the "off" state), but often you will have to learn the individual combinations separately, almost as new verbs.
Dozy
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How to use up, off and out after a verb? #3 (permalink) Fri Feb 24, 2012 4:15 am   How to use up, off and out after a verb?
 

Dozy wrote:
Are you talking about phrasal verbs such as "call up", "call off" and "call out"? The meanings of these are often idiomatic and are not reliably predictable from the component parts. Certain patterns exist (for example, "up" can often denote something done thoroughly or completely, though not in "call up"!), and sometimes the connection is fairly obvious (for example "switching off the TV" puts the TV into the "off" state), but often you will have to learn the individual combinations separately, almost as new verbs.


oooops!--- hahahahaha I guess I'm in troubles again....! you know, since in Spanish we don't need to add nothing to a verb to express out or off or out or an imperative form it's hard to understand how to learn those phrasal verbs -thanks for the grammar information- and use them into a fluid conversation or building phrases and sentences correctly. But I'll try to learn them as new verbs. I thought there were some grammar rules for, but..... oh my God I'm scared!.... hahahahahaha

Thank you very much, Dozy... I think we are going to see each other frequently in this forum. =)
Lovingruby
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 17 Feb 2012
Posts: 20
Location: Mexico

How to use up, off and out after a verb? #4 (permalink) Fri Feb 24, 2012 13:12 pm   How to use up, off and out after a verb?
 

Keep in mind the difference between these "phrasal verbs" and the "ordinary" case of a verb with its usual meaning, followed by a preposition with its usual meaning. Both are common in English. For example, we can see that "sit on a chair" uses "sit" in its usual sense, plus "on" in its usual sense. However, in "my sister and I don't get on", "get on" means "have good personal relations", which is not obviously related to "get" and "on".
Dozy
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How to use up, off and out after a verb? #5 (permalink) Sat Feb 25, 2012 5:30 am   How to use up, off and out after a verb?
 

Dozy wrote:
Keep in mind the difference between these "phrasal verbs" and the "ordinary" case of a verb with its usual meaning, followed by a preposition with its usual meaning. Both are common in English. For example, we can see that "sit on a chair" uses "sit" in its usual sense, plus "on" in its usual sense. However, in "my sister and I don't get on", "get on" means "have good personal relations", which is not obviously related to "get" and "on".


Thanks Dozy... in fact it is not hard to understand those examples of what you are talking about... the problems start when the preposition changes the meaning of the verb at all. Well, I guess in all languages exist such"tricks" or idioms that only native speakers can use and understand. There isn't another way but study them and practice into a conversation.

I love this site, it really works! In few days I have learned much more than in all my life at school... [/i]
Lovingruby
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 17 Feb 2012
Posts: 20
Location: Mexico

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