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Kind of Preposition



 
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Kill me of or kill me with thirst? | Better expression: 'two inch' vs. 'two inches'
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Kind of Preposition #1 (permalink) Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:32 am   Kind of Preposition
 

Hi teachers

There are many kinds of preposition. Thus, How namy kinds of them?

Thanks in advance

Jupiter
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Prepositions #2 (permalink) Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:51 am   Prepositions
 

Hi Jupiter,

Apart from the use of prepositions with particular verbs and in special constructions like the passive, prepositions tend to fall into two main categories: time and place - included in space is also movement. I have written a piece on prepostions for the site, which you may like to look at. Check to see how many types you can find:

http://www.english-test.net/lessons/4/index.html

Alan
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Kind of Preposition #3 (permalink) Fri Jun 02, 2006 10:49 am   Kind of Preposition
 

Dear Alan

That was interesting! :D

You wrote: " At the time I was living in a small village about 25 miles from London."

What is at the time ?

Is it a fixed expression?

Yours

Tom
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Kind of Preposition #4 (permalink) Fri Jun 02, 2006 19:47 pm   Kind of Preposition
 

Dear Amy

What do you think about this expression? Is it a fixed idiom or what? Please use it in one sentence.

Tom
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At the time when that happened... #5 (permalink) Fri Jun 02, 2006 19:56 pm   At the time when that happened...
 

Hi Tom

It is a standard expression and can simply be used to refer back to something that has already been mentioned in a previous sentence. (i.e., to illustrate the usage, you would normally need more than one sentence.)
It means "at the time when that happened".

I've had a look at Alan's text. Basically, I understand his "at the time" to mean: "at the time when this story about how I got a job happened".

Amy
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