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She had been spoken to...?



 
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She had been spoken to...? #1 (permalink) Sun Oct 24, 2004 8:26 am   She had been spoken to...?
 

Test No. incompl/inter-91 "Tenses (2)", question 5

She was annoyed that she ......... spoken to like that.

(a) had been
(b) has been
(c) was been
(d) will have been

Test No. incompl/inter-91 "Tenses (2)", answer 5

She was annoyed that she had been spoken to like that.

Correct answer: (a) had been
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why is the answer had been and not have been or has been or was spoken to like that
asterick
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She had been spoken to...? #2 (permalink) Sun Oct 24, 2004 13:02 pm   She had been spoken to...?
 

Hi Asterick,

Thanks for asking this interesting question.
In the sentence you are referring to two things happen: First somebody speaks to another person in an impolite or unpleasant way after which this person gets angry.
The construction she had been spoken to is passive voice. (subject + form of have + past participle).

Because we are talking about something that happened in the past the first action (she had been spoken to) is in the Past Perfect tense and the second action (she was annoyed) is in the Simple Past tense.

After she, he and it we use has not have.

Let us know if you have any further questions. Regards. Torsten

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She had been spoken to...? #3 (permalink) Fri Jun 02, 2006 17:39 pm   She had been spoken to...?
 

Well, i answered 'has been' first, and still not sure i understand that 'had been' is right.
Is it because, that action 'speaking' was completed somewhere in the past (after what she became angry), but has nothing to do with present situation? The result of 'speaking' doesn't effect (or has no effect - what is better?) on present. (At least it's not obvious looking at this sentence). Is my logic right?
Ryoga
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Tense #4 (permalink) Fri Jun 02, 2006 19:11 pm   Tense
 

Hi Ryoga,

The sentence:
Quote:
She was annoyed that she had been spoken to like that.
Correct answer: (a) had been

_________________________

If you look at it from the point of view of the sequence ot times, first she was spoken to in a certain way and second she became annoyed. If you join the two times together, was annoyed is past and had been spoken to is past perfect. We know the speaking to came first because of the word that indicating that it happened before she was annoyed.

Alan
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