Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
to grant a person or persons legal custodianship over property not belonging to them
deploy
attire
carry
trustee
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

What is the difference between "grey" and "gray"?



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Expression: Many a time | Definition of 'P&L effect'?
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
What is the difference between "grey" and "gray"? #1 (permalink) Tue Jun 06, 2006 19:49 pm   What is the difference between "grey" and "gray"?
 

On this webpage it's argued that 'grey' is the British and 'gray' the American spelling (when referring to the colour). Also the Oxford Dictionary of English gives 'gray' as an American variant spelling of 'grey'. Interestingly, however, in Edith Wharton's works the spelling 'grey' is used notwithstanding the author's American origin. And Oscar Wilde, a Briton, sticks by 'gray'. Has the British spelling turned American or vice versa over the years or what is this about?
Curious
Guest





Grey or gray #2 (permalink) Tue Jun 06, 2006 20:16 pm   Grey or gray
 

Hi Curious

Are those the only two authors you've discovered where the spelling of gray/grey doesn't seem to match the nationality?
I think if you know a little something about the backgrounds of these two authors, you might be able to come up with a theory or two that would explain this "shocking" spelling phenomenon. :lol:

The accepted and standard spelling in the US is gray.

But I'm in favor of eliminating the spelling confusion altogether --- by changing the spelling internationally to greigh. :lol: :lol: Think there's a chance? ;)

Amy
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

Learn some cool expressions in the following cool storyEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Learn how to explore English words! Subscribe to free email English course
Grey or gray #3 (permalink) Tue Jun 06, 2006 21:16 pm   Grey or gray
 

Yankee wrote:
Hi Curious

Are those the only two authors you've discovered where the spelling of gray/grey doesn't seem to match the nationality?
I think if you know a little something about the backgrounds of these two authors, you might be able to come up with a theory or two that would explain this "shocking" spelling phenomenon. :lol:

The accepted and standard spelling in the US is gray.

But I'm in favor of eliminating the spelling confusion altogether --- by changing the spelling internationally to greigh. :lol: :lol: Think there's a chance? ;)

Amy


Yes... Languages are open systems so we could start using 'greigh' and before long it'd be listed in the ODE. :lol:

Seriously: of course there are many authors whose style of writing does not correspond with their nationality. It just happens that these authors didn't really write yesterday so I was wondering if there was someting in the etymology of the word to consider.

By the way, what does 'gray' refer to in Standard British English?
Guest






Grey or gray #4 (permalink) Wed Jun 07, 2006 9:54 am   Grey or gray
 

Yankee wrote:
The accepted and standard spelling in the US is gray.

I went to one of the top public school systems in the US, and when I was learning to write they taught us to write grey. I didn't find out about gray until a few years later.

Notice also that there are many people in the UK with the surname "Gray". That spelling must have originated in the UK, and not in America.

A lot of those "American" and "British" variations are more complicated than the dictionaries would make you think, and some of them are phony. Often both variants are used in both places, but a different one dominates in each.
Jamie (K)
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 6761
Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

Grey or gray #5 (permalink) Wed Jun 07, 2006 9:58 am   Grey or gray
 

Glad to finally discover that my school system must have been sub-standard. :lol:
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

Grey or gray #6 (permalink) Wed Jun 07, 2006 10:33 am   Grey or gray
 

Yankee wrote:
Glad to finally discover that my school system must have been sub-standard. :lol:

I'm not saying that! I'm just trying to say that MY school system was not substandard!
Jamie (K)
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 6761
Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

Display posts from previous:   
Expression: Many a time | Definition of 'P&L effect'?
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
Are "fad diets" weight-losing diets?Meaning of D.O.AActive/ Passive voiceQuotation: Memory is a device...Life-and-death scary and rollercoaster scaryNiece or nephewHow to use 'Have you' and 'Did you'?Keep something in perspective20 seconds flat!Expression: Wit has truth in it:Meaning of 'can't stand'It had been 'she' who...A droplet the size of a BB?

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail