Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
quiet; tranquil; calm; motionless
still
lucid
second
tense
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

My teacher says it's posh to say...


Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
ESL Forum | What do you want to talk about?
Happy 4th of July | How reliable is your Internet provider?
listening exercises
Message
Author
My teacher says it's posh to say... #1 (permalink) Fri Jun 29, 2012 14:54 pm   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

My teacher says it's posh to say-

Often as Oftn.

And I like to say it. Oftn, Oftn, Oftn.

Oh, my teacher is a native British. She comes from London, and she's so rich..

kind regards.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

My teacher says it's posh to say... #2 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 0:24 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

In North America, "ofn" is standard, and "oftn" makes the person sound slightly uneducated.
Jamie (K)
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 6771
Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

How do you use the English Prepositions correctly?English grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Read these English anecdotes and maybe smile today? Subscribe to free email English course
My teacher says it's posh to say... #3 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 4:15 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

I know. Thank you.

But English comes from England, Britain and the UK.

Not from North America. In North America they originally have native Indian languages only? They don't even have their own language and literature at all. So they use English as Fake mother tongue. So I don't have to follow your way. I don't know.

(The US Dеpartment of Education, Institute of Education Sciences has conducted large scale assessment of adult proficiency in 1992 and 2003 using a common methodology from which trends could be measured. The study measures Prose, Document, and Quantitative skills and 19,000 subjects participated in the 2003 survey. There was no significant change in Prose or Document skills and a slight increase in Quantitative skills. As in 2008, roughly 15% of the sample could function at the highest levels in all three categories. Roughly 40% were at either basic or below basic levels of proficiency in all three categories.The study identifies a class of adults who, although not meeting criteria for functional illiteracy, face reduced job opportunities and life prospects due to inadequate literacy levels relative to the requirements of contemporary society.

The study, the most comprehensive study of literacy ever commissioned by the U.S. government, was released in April 2002 and reapplied in 2003 giving trend data. It involved lengthy interviews of over 90,700 adults statistically balanced for age, gender, ethnicity, education level, and location (urban, suburban, or rural) in 12 states across the U.S. and was designed to represent the U.S. population as a whole. This government study showed that 21% to 23% of adult Americans were not "able to locate information in text", could not "make low-level inferences using printed materials", and were unable to "integrate easily identifiable pieces of information." Further, this study showed that 41% to 44% of U.S. adults in the lowest level on the literacy scale (literacy rate of 35 or below) were living in poverty.

A follow-up study by the same group of researchers using a smaller database (19,714 interviewees) was released in 2006 that showed some upward movement of low end (basic and below to intermediate) in U.S. adult literacy levels and a decline in the full proficiency group.

Thus, if this bottom quantile of the study is equated with the functionally illiterate, and these are then removed from those classified as literate, then the resultant literacy rate for the United States would be at most 65-85% depending on where in the basic, minimal competence quantile one sets the cutoff.

The 15% figure for full literacy, equivalent to a university undergraduate level, is consistent with the notion that the "average" American reads at a 7th or 8th grade level which is also consistent with recommendations, guidelines, and norms of readability for medication directions, product information, and popular fiction. ) wiki.

But I know not all American are educated and not all educated American are knowledgeable and decent. I hate to say it.

As for a Burmese I know some British English, some German and that's enough. I don't want any education or language from idiots with some fake paper qualifications.

kind regards.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

My teacher says it's posh to say... #4 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 4:31 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

You shouldn't waste your time spoiling my knowledgeable topics. Try your own . And let's see the readers like it or not.

Goodbye for good.

kind regards.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

My teacher says it's posh to say... #5 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 5:21 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

English was brought to America by the English, so don't pursue that canard about English being our "fake mother tongue". We do have our own literature, much of which is taught in UK schools, and the lowbrow stuff is gobbled up to the tune of billions of dollars by the British reading public.

The UK has a similar functional illiteracy rate to that in the US, about 20%. You can read about it here:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/7691919/Fifth-of-school-leavers-illiterate-and-innumerate.html
Talk to some of the high school English teachers in London, and they'll tell you that they have to deal with almost literally the same literacy problems that teachers in an American ghetto do.

By the way, I checked my Oxford UK dictionary, and it lists "ofn" as the preferred British pronunciation, so it agrees with the American preference. Maybe your teacher doesn't know what she's talking about.
Jamie (K)
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 6771
Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

My teacher says it's posh to say... #6 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 5:25 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

Have you seen Oftn in A.S Hornby's.

I know you point, I said it is posh. Do you really read English?

kind regards.

I hope you don't mind, I don't want to talk to you. Sorry. I said don't waste your time. Find someone who would say you Yes.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

My teacher says it's posh to say... #7 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 5:42 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

For someone who doesn't want to talk to me, you sure did a lot of talking!
Jamie (K)
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 6771
Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

My teacher says it's posh to say... #8 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 5:52 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

I said goodbye in a nice way. I don't want it to be rude. If you are a decent human. I just don't like to deal with you. You don't even have a own photo. And you want to teach me things you don't really know. Please don't bother me anymore. You know what, from you writings I know you have a low and rude roots.

kind regards.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

My teacher says it's posh to say... #9 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 5:55 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

You just get funnier and funnier.
Jamie (K)
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 6771
Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

My teacher says it's posh to say... #10 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 6:09 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

Hi Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin,

I think it's in very poor taste to speak to people in that manner, especially to people who want to help you. Frankly I thought better of you.
_________________
"He who tries to establish his point by much yelling shows that his reasoning is weak"
-Jodi Ann Arias
Our Tort System
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 May 2010
Posts: 3886
Location: The big apple

My teacher says it's posh to say... #11 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 6:24 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

Is the person helping me? or Harassing me?

But I don't need its help on this very topic? Would you take its help if you were me?

Thank you for your comments on me.

But, I draw a line at rude anonymous people. I simply don't want guilt and dirt.

My purposes are clear, not to make friends with the lowly, but to learn English from the genuine masters.

Would you be always kind and decent to answer continuous anonymous malicious phone calls, wouldn't you swear or curse on them?

kind regards.

P.S - It should be, You're getting funnier and funnier? ( To my Burmese English knowledge, it should be in present continuous tense in this very situation, using Get. )
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

My teacher says it's posh to say... #12 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 6:42 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

Even a worm will turn , they say. Don't they?

kind regards.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

My teacher says it's posh to say... #13 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 9:18 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

Please activate Javascript in your browser to listen to this audio recording

 54 Listened
Download mp3 Click to listen

Hi,

This does seem a bit of a storm in a teacup - reading so much into one little word. To me pronouncing the 't' in 'often' does sound odd. I would pronounce it without sounding the 't' and follow the same pronunciation with 'soften'.
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 17284
Location: UK

My teacher says it's posh to say... #14 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 10:29 am   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin wrote:
Is the person helping me? or Harassing me?

I think you're being too defensive in your comments, for no apparent to me reason,
Jamie lent you a helping hand, that's all. I'm sure he didn't intend to offend you, let alone harrass you. You turned his comment on its head.
And it was unenlightened of you to suggest that Americans don't have litrerature. Of course they do. Edgar Alan Poe, Mark Twain, Stephen King to name a few prominent American authors. I hope they do ring a bell to you (I'd be hard pressed to find a person who didn't know them in my country). Word to the wise: before making such sweeping and potentially offensive statements, you'd do well to do research into the matter first.

Best of luck to you!
_________________
"He who tries to establish his point by much yelling shows that his reasoning is weak"
-Jodi Ann Arias
Our Tort System
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 May 2010
Posts: 3886
Location: The big apple

My teacher says it's posh to say... #15 (permalink) Wed Jul 04, 2012 16:17 pm   My teacher says it's posh to say...
 

That's a very professional kind of comment Mr. Alan. I only expect that kind of teaching from genuine experts.

I have some CDs published by Cambridge, Longman and Penguin. They still pronounce often as oftn sometimes. Most of them are in British English both in writing and speaking. Maybe they also wish to tell there is a variation. You may experience some people say Think as Sink in a fashion/ style. I don't know as I donch know or I dunno.

Saint Paul as Sam Paul. Assimilation?

I know your point of direction to compare with soften. Of course, nobody would pronounce soften as softn. Nobody.

But some British people do pronounce Often as Oftn. Especially when the word is at the end of the sentence.

As you know we, ESL learners are curious and we have the rights to be curious. No offence?

I don't know my teacher Jackie from London ( White and so English ) pronounces Often as Oftn. I follow my teacher. That's my personal preference?

After all it's just an uneducated curiosity of a Burmese. No big deal. Fair enough.

And I still remember you did give me the right answer for Why do they call parts of speech?. They haven't created the sentences then?

You are a genuine expert. Thank you.

kind regards.

If you don't mind your location in your profile should be the UK rather than UK? It's just a slip I know.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

Display posts from previous:   
Happy 4th of July | How reliable is your Internet provider?
ESL Forum | What do you want to talk about? All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2
Latest topics on English Forums
The Journey.The midnight watchman.Funnily named US cities/towns/townships/counties etc.Have you ever read "Death Interruption" a story book by Joseph SaramagoOlympic torchOuter spaceUncle Mas, You are losing Burma again to Mr. Anchi.Congratulations Mr. Yuri!My teacher says it's posh to say..., page 2Who are the most powerful stakeholders of a business?How I acquire English wordsThe Asians' World?The Hereafter.

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail