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She looks like a star?


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ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Conditional III | Meaning of 'Once this disclosure is highlighted'
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She looks like a star? #1 (permalink) Mon Nov 01, 2004 11:25 am   She looks like a star?
 

Test No. incompl/elem-1 "Speaking already", question 5

She looks ......... a famous film star.

(a) as
(b) like
(c) similar
(d) same

Test No. incompl/elem-1 "Speaking already", answer 5

She looks like a famous film star.

Correct answer: (b) like
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please the answer
haldun
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Question #2 (permalink) Mon Nov 01, 2004 11:36 am   Question
 

What is your question?
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Question #3 (permalink) Tue Dec 28, 2004 23:32 pm   Question
 

Alan wrote:
What is your question?

Hello
Could you remind me the difference between as & like ?

Thank

Matt from Paris
matt
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As vs. like #4 (permalink) Tue Dec 28, 2004 23:50 pm   As vs. like
 

Matt,

Take a look at these examples:

Do as I say.
Do it like this.

She walks and talks like a movie star.
As I said last Friday, it's time to make a decision.

We use as + clause (subject and verb) and like + noun, pronoun or adverb.

TOEFL listening lectures: How did Queen Elizabeth acknowledge the English victory?
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She looks like a star? #5 (permalink) Sat Mar 12, 2005 6:54 am   She looks like a star?
 



I didn't know exactly how to use "AS" and "LIKE" correctly.

:D:D:D:D

But I think that now it won't be so hard for me the use of these two words.

THANKYOU!!!
Adriana
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Joined: 06 Mar 2005
Posts: 6
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Example on your explanation for as vs. like #6 (permalink) Thu Apr 21, 2005 13:22 pm   Example on your explanation for as vs. like
 

can you provide me more examples on your explanation about as and like,,,, ? thx a lot
mohannad
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There is additional explanation as vs. like #7 (permalink) Thu Apr 21, 2005 13:32 pm   There is additional explanation as vs. like
 

Torsten wrote:
Matt,

Take a look at these examples:

Do as I say.
Do it like this.

She walks and talks like a movie star.
As I said last Friday, it's time to make a decision.

We use as + clause (subject and verb) and like + noun, pronoun or adverb.

please check my examples:

1. he looks like a Palestinian.......this is not meant that he is a palestinian

2. he is as a Palestinian .... he is 100% a Palestinian

i am sorry if i am wrong :) . but can you make it clear?
mohannad
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As vs like #8 (permalink) Wed Jun 22, 2005 3:36 am   As vs like
 

:?: I'm not really so sure about the use of these two words, because I have thought that like was used when we're making some comparation in a particular sence but as when we're talking about a general manner; so could you please check these two sentences below:

She looks like her mother
She looks as a big movie star

What's the real meaning on each one?

Thanks a lot!
tavo
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Just my two cents #9 (permalink) Wed Jun 22, 2005 21:02 pm   Just my two cents
 

I'm gonna try and put my two cents here. When to use which is a matter of practice I'd say, but there is kind of sublte nuance between these two. I'll explain what in my opinion could help to tell them apart.

like: when similarity is stated in physical or other characteristic.

as: when similarity is described in such a way or manner.

ej. she is like her mother: they look alike.

she worsks as a manager: her job is one of a manager.


She looks as a big movie star: I don't think this one is correct though
Rich7
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She looks like a star? #10 (permalink) Thu Oct 06, 2005 13:32 pm   She looks like a star?
 

ok here is the defenition of both words, it may help a little:

defenition of Like:
1.To find pleasant or attractive; enjoy.
2.To want to have: would like some coffee.
3.To feel about; regard: How do you like her nerve!
Archaic. To be pleasing to.

sorry, but the dictionary i see no defenition of AS. :? so theres the defentiion of like i guess.

hope it helps!

Mathieu
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She looks like a star? #11 (permalink) Fri Oct 07, 2005 5:32 am   She looks like a star?
 

I think we can learn more from here:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/As
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As vs. like #12 (permalink) Tue Jan 17, 2006 15:58 pm   As vs. like
 

he works as a teacher.
he looks like a teacher.
he looks nice.
why can we say he looks like nice. when do we say look like?
Polska
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She looks like a star? #13 (permalink) Sun Oct 26, 2008 14:57 pm   She looks like a star?
 

i still confuse about as and like?
please answer in this topic.
thak you very much.
Icy
New Member


Joined: 26 Oct 2008
Posts: 3

She looks like a star? #14 (permalink) Thu Nov 27, 2008 16:05 pm   She looks like a star?
 

as and like use in this situation are preposition. Here are the descriptions:
-'as' used to describe sb/sth appearing to be sb/sth else: The bomb was disguised as a package.
-'as' used to describe the fact that sb/sth has a particular job or function: she works as a teacher (she isn't a teacher)

-'like' used to describe 'similar to sb/sth': she looks like her mother.
Anonymousdt
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As vs. like #15 (permalink) Sat Sep 26, 2009 10:39 am   As vs. like
 

Polska wrote:
he works as a teacher.
he looks like a teacher.
he looks nice.
why can we say he looks like nice. when do we say look like?

Hi Polska,
This is known as subject verb agreement i.e a singular noun or pronoun takes a singular verb and as he is singular we cannot use look with he.
But I and you are exceptional cases they take plural verb for instance, I do painting, I work in an MNC.
Please correct if i am wrong..
Nainajain
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Joined: 17 Sep 2009
Posts: 20
Location: India

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