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Idiom: Made a mistake


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Idiom: Made a mistake #1 (permalink) Thu Nov 11, 2004 4:42 am   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

Test No. incompl/elem-1 "Speaking already", question 7

I only ......... one mistake in last night's test.

(a) made
(b) done
(c) did
(d) make

Test No. incompl/elem-1 "Speaking already", answer 7

I only made one mistake in last night's test.

Correct answer: (a) made

Your answer was: incorrect
I only did one mistake in last night's test.
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could you explain more?

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Make a mistake #2 (permalink) Thu Nov 11, 2004 9:00 am   Make a mistake
 

This is an idiom and means: get something wrong/incorrect.
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Idiom: Made a mistake #3 (permalink) Mon Apr 21, 2008 3:55 am   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

what is different between "do" and "make"?
Manhnt
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Idiom: Made a mistake #4 (permalink) Mon May 05, 2008 11:25 am   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

Why is done incorrect in this sentence?

-----
I only made one mistake in last night's test.
Correct answer: (a) made
Your answer was: incorrect
your sentence:
I only done one mistake in last night's test.
Netstudent
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Idiom: Made a mistake #5 (permalink) Mon May 05, 2008 13:29 pm   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

manhnt wrote:
what is different between "do" and "make"?

This is a stumbling block for many English learners :)
You have to find as many cases where make or do is used and learn them by heart.
Fortunately, on this forum this matter has been discussed many times. Here is a story written by Alan: Make or Do? or "Doing Time"
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Idiom: Made a mistake #6 (permalink) Mon May 05, 2008 15:14 pm   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

netstudent wrote:
Why is done incorrect in this sentence?
-----
I only made one mistake in last night's test.
Correct answer: (a) made
Your answer was: incorrect
your sentence:
I only done one mistake in last night's test.

Besides the fact that 'make a mistake' is a standard collocation, the use of the past participle (done) is also grammatically incorrect in the sentence.
.
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Idiom: Made a mistake #7 (permalink) Tue May 06, 2008 13:26 pm   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

manhnt wrote:
what is different between "do" and "make"?

Hi mahnt,

Thank you for your post. I'm sure you wanted to say "What is the difference between "do" and "make"?"

To answer your question,

we use "do" for activities of a more general nature:

What are you doing there?
Do you want me to do the housework? - No, thanks. I'll do it.
My job's boring. I have to do the same tasks every day.

and we use make if we produce or manufacture things:

Everybody makes mistakes.
IBM make computers.
I make coffe in the morning, and Sue sometimes makes cakes.
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Idiom: Made a mistake #8 (permalink) Tue May 06, 2008 15:12 pm   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

Here are some specifics.

Collocations with do:
do badly
do business
do damage
do a deal
do the dishes
do a favor/do someone a favor
do good
do harm
do homework
do housework
do one's best
do one's fair share
do one's hair
do one's nails
do one's worst
do research
do the talking
do time
do well
do without
do work

Collocations with make:
make amends
make arrangements
make a bed
make believe
make the best of (a situation)
make breakfast/lunch/dinner
make a call
make a choice
make a comment
make a commitment
make a complaint
make a decision
make a difference
make an effort
make an excuse
make a fool of yourself
make a fortune
make a friend
make friends
make a fuss
make hay
make a journey
make love
make a meal
make a mess
make a mistake
make money
make a mountain out of a molehill
make a move
make a movie
make a noise/make noise
make an offer
make a phone call
make a plan/make plans
make a point
make a profit
make progress
make a promise
make a remark
make a sound
make a speech
make a suggestion
make time (for)
make a visit
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Idiom: Made a mistake #9 (permalink) Tue May 06, 2008 16:49 pm   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

I shall continue

Do drugs
Do one's nut
Do a (funny) impression (of somebody)

Make do
Make an impression

:)

Hi, Amy

By the way, do you familiar with the idiom "do one's nut" ? I heard it is British slang.
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Idiom: Made a mistake #10 (permalink) Tue May 06, 2008 19:23 pm   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

lost_soul wrote:
I shall continue
In American English you should say "I will continue." :wink:

lost_soul wrote:
By the way, are you familiar with the idiom "do one's nut" ? I heard it is British slang.
Nope, I've never heard that expression before. You'd probably be misunderstood if you tried to use that expression over here. :wink:
.
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Idiom: Made a mistake #11 (permalink) Tue May 06, 2008 19:28 pm   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

Hi Alex,

A very common one here is 'do your head in'. If someone is being very authoritative and bossy towards you, you could say: You're doing my head in, which means you are driving me up the wall.

Alan
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Idiom: Made a mistake #12 (permalink) Tue May 06, 2008 19:33 pm   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

.
I've never heard that expression either.
Then again, maybe there is such an abundance of bossy, pompous people in your area in particular that there was a need for that special British idiom. :wink:

On the other hand, I have heard the idioms 'do someone in' and 'be done in'.
.
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Idiom: Made a mistake #13 (permalink) Sun Jul 06, 2008 3:57 am   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

thanhk you very much about this lesson
Thuytrang3004
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Idiom: Made a mistake #14 (permalink) Thu Aug 07, 2008 11:16 am   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

Hi
I don't understand what does 'do someone in" mean and "drive someone up"
In my opinion. 'Do someone in' have meaning is make somebody hurt???
Hoanghuong
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Idiom: Made a mistake #15 (permalink) Thu Aug 07, 2008 11:28 am   Idiom: Made a mistake
 

If you drive someone up the wall, you make them very angry. It's an idiom.

TOEIC listening, question-response: You didn't shut down your computer, did you?
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