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'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth'



 
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'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth' #1 (permalink) Sat Aug 26, 2006 18:26 pm   'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth'
 

English Idioms and Expressions, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #8 "Preposition Exercises", question 4

He's always interested in elections and is very much into politics.

(a) very concerned about
(b) very worried about
(c) very interested in
(d) very happy about

English Idioms and Expressions, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #8 "Preposition Exercises", answer 4

He's always interested in elections and is very interested in politics.

Correct answer: (c) very interested in
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'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth' #2 (permalink) Sat Aug 26, 2006 18:47 pm   'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth'
 

Hi

There are words in boldface type in the test sentence. You have to decide which of the choices means the same thing as the words in boldface type:

Quote:
He's always interested in elections and is very much into politics.

(a) very concerned about
(b) very worried about
(c) very interested in
(d) very happy about

The answer is:
(c) very interested in
.
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'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth' #3 (permalink) Sun Aug 27, 2006 7:56 am   'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth'
 

Hi, Amy:

Do you think that "be into sth" is less formal than "be interested in sth"?

How about "go for sth"?
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'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth' #4 (permalink) Sun Aug 27, 2006 8:34 am   'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth'
 

Hi FangFang

Yes, be into something and go for something both sound more informal to me.

Amy
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Go for #5 (permalink) Sun Aug 27, 2006 9:25 am   Go for
 

Hi FangFang,

Go for something changes the meaning as it's different from interested in and very much into. The last two simply indicate that someone finds something interesting. Go for is more active because here the emphasis is on making an effort to use an opportunity as in:

Question: What do you think I should do? Should I accept the offer or turn it down?

Answer: If I were you I would go for it and accept the offer.


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'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth' #6 (permalink) Sun Aug 27, 2006 10:09 am   'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth'
 

Hi Alan

What you're talking about is a different idiom, in my opinion. It exists as the fairly firmly fixed expression "go for it".

For me "go for something" means "be interested in something". I'd say it's also typically used with the word really:
"I really go for ..."
Maybe this idiom is unknown in BE...(?)

Amy
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Go for #7 (permalink) Sun Aug 27, 2006 10:35 am   Go for
 

Hi Amy,

To me 'go for' is available for one or two meanings but I can't quite get my head round (I love that expression) the idea of it meaning interested in as I would regard it as being in a different league. So let me show what I mean.

It has the meaning of opt for(often with the idea of seizing an opportunity as in my illustrative sentence) but also when 'going for' or choosing one of the options for example in our famous multiple choice tests.

It has also almost a sense of being a fan of or even stronger as in: go for something (or someone if you like) in a big way suggesting that you are (very) fond of it or them but to me that's not the same as being interested in.

I hope I'm not splitting hairs.

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'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth' #8 (permalink) Sun Aug 27, 2006 11:22 am   'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth'
 

.
Let's just go for the British opinion then. I don't really go for pointless discussions. I'm neither fond of them nor interested in them.
.
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'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth' #9 (permalink) Sat Nov 07, 2009 17:25 pm   'be into sth' is less formal than 'be interested in sth'
 

That's what I found in Cambridge Advanced learner's Dictionary:
go for sth 1
go for sth (TRY) phrasal verb
to try to have or achieve something:
She tripped me as I went for the ball.
Are you planning to go for that scholarship to Harvard University?
The Russian relay team will again be going for the gold medal at the Olympic Games.

go for sth 2
go for sth (CHOOSE) phrasal verb
to choose something:
Instead of butter, I always go for margarine or a low-fat spread.

go for sth 3
go for sth (LIKE) phrasal verb
to like or admire:
I don't go for war films in a big way (= very much).
What sort of men do you go for (= are you attracted to)?

go for sth 4
go for sth (MONEY) phrasal verb
If something goes for a certain amount of money, it is sold for that amount:
The painting is expected to go for at least a million dollars.
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