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Meaning of "to do one's hair"



 
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Meaning of "to do one's hair" #1 (permalink) Tue Aug 29, 2006 9:40 am   Meaning of "to do one's hair"
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #92 "Using Make and Do (2)", question 5

I'm not quite ready yet — I have to ......... my hair.

(a) make
(b) do
(c) made
(d) did

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #92 "Using Make and Do (2)", answer 5

I'm not quite ready yet — I have to do my hair.

Correct answer: (b) do

Your answer was: incorrect
I'm not quite ready yet — I have to make my hair.
_________________________

What does it mean to do one's hair? Does it mean to make a new hairstyle or to get it in a tidy condition (if it is untidy or shaggy...)

Did I make any grammatical errors in the above sentences?

Thanks !

Ljiljan Maksimović
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Do your hair #2 (permalink) Tue Aug 29, 2006 9:55 am   Do your hair
 

Hi Ljiljan Maksimovich,

Do your hair can mean the whole range that you have suggested. It can simply mean comb or make tidy and it can also mean wash it, style it and so on.

Alan
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"to do one's hair" #3 (permalink) Tue Aug 29, 2006 12:42 pm   "to do one's hair"
 

"Do my hair": It usually just means comb or tidy my hair. If you go to a hairdresser you would say you were "getting" or "having your hair done".
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"to do one's hair" #4 (permalink) Tue Aug 29, 2006 13:20 pm   "to do one's hair"
 

dOlier wrote:
"Do my hair": It usually just means comb or tidy my hair. If you go to a hairdresser you would say you were "getting" or "having your hair done".

Hi Boys :wink:

If you'll pardon my saying so, only a man would think of a little combing or tidying as "do my hair". :lol:

When I do my hair (I'm of the feminine persuasion), there's definitely more involved than a little combing or tidying. :)

So, it seems the meaning of this expression may be somewhat gender specific. :D

Or is there also an element or BE vs AmE here?

Amy
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Do #5 (permalink) Tue Aug 29, 2006 13:25 pm   Do
 

Like I said:

Quote:
Do your hair can mean the whole range that you have suggested. It can simply mean comb or make tidy and it can also mean wash it, style it and so on.

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Indian head massage :-) #6 (permalink) Tue Aug 29, 2006 13:34 pm   Indian head massage :-)
 

Hi all :)

Yes, when I make an appointment (in the UK - hi, Amy :) ) in a hairdressing saloon to have my hair done it can mean many various things – from 'just a cut and blow-dry' to having multicolored highlights :)

But I am not still sure would it be appropriate term if you just have some hair care – with no any immediate visual effect :)
Or what?
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Meaning of "to do one's hair" #7 (permalink) Tue Aug 29, 2006 13:45 pm   Meaning of "to do one's hair"
 

Hi Alan

Yes, I noticed that and that was very admirable of you. :D

Maybe I should put it this way:

In my opinion, a female would have come up with the interpretation/definition "comb or make tidy" mainly as an afterthought (if at all :lol:) whereas "comb or make tidy" might be a primary interpretation for a man. ;)

Amy
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Do #8 (permalink) Tue Aug 29, 2006 14:03 pm   Do
 

Hi,

All I can say is Gosh - not wishing to split hairs. I could be even bolder and say: The original question has certainly set the hare running.

Alan
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Meaning of "to do one's hair" #9 (permalink) Tue Aug 29, 2006 14:39 pm   Meaning of "to do one's hair"
 

Hi Tamara

Yes, "visual effect" or some careful styling...

The interpretation of this expression may explain why many men don't understand why women often require so much time in the bathroom. :lol:

Wife to husband: "I'll be finished shortly, hon. I just have to do my hair."
(The woman means 15-30 minutes)
(The man understands 15-30 seconds.)
:lol:

Amy
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