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Just curious



 
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Just curious #1 (permalink) Sat Nov 03, 2012 13:51 pm   Just curious
 

Mostly all the words written below don't exist in learners/ medium English dictionaries. I don't find them often in reference books and avoid using them. These are:
a. Mark-sheet
b. Bio-data
c. Bringel
d. Tiffin
e. by foot
f. Day scholar etc..
These words are just a touch on the surface. There are lots as you know and they are widly used in most of the Asian countries as standard and formal English. Undoubtedly, these words must be from India. So the point is: Is the English that's written and spoken in India International and acceptable in the world? Just curious.

Noren
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Just curious #2 (permalink) Sat Nov 03, 2012 14:18 pm   Just curious
 

I think your logic that they must be Indian expressions because they cannot be found in your dictionaries is faulty.
a. is common as one word 'marksheet' or two non-hyphenated words 'mark sheet'. It doesn't seem particularly 'Indian' in origin.
b as above 'biodata'. It doesn't seem particularly 'Indian' in origin.
c - never heard of this.
d. is old fashioned in BrE, and more likely to be understood be some people as the name of a particular cake rather than as a light meal.
e. I don't see why you think this is an Indian expression, unless it means something other than walking, as opposed to another means of travel. 'By foot' and 'on foot' are both common. I wouldn't expect it to exist in most dictionaries as it is a two word phrase comprising separate components.
f. I don't see why you think this is an Indian expression. Again, it is a two word phrase comprising separate components.
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Just curious #3 (permalink) Sat Nov 03, 2012 14:58 pm   Just curious
 

Thank you very much for your clear-cut explanation. You may or may not be aware of the fact that most of the English text books are prepared (published) / written by the Indians. So 90% (my extimate) of the educated Nepalese speak and write in Indian style.
No matter what the outcome wil be, I prefer CV or Resume.
Don't write or say "tiffin". I choose Recess.
c. It's aubergine / eggplant

I didn't mean to say that the words' origin. I simply wanted to say that these words are popular and mostly used here too. I don't think it as international English.
_________________
A person who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything.
Noren
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 11 Oct 2008
Posts: 1205
Location: NEPAL

Just curious #4 (permalink) Sat Nov 03, 2012 15:23 pm   Just curious
 

Noren wrote:
You may or may not be aware of the fact that most of the English text books are prepared (published) / written by the Indians.

That is untrue.
I suspect you mean 'most of the English text books available to me are published by the Indians'.

Quote:
No matter what the outcome will be, I prefer CV or Resume.

You'd prefer 'CV' or 'resume' over what other term?

Quote:
Don't write or say "tiffin". I choose Recess.

Different terms with different meanings, to my knowledge.
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Just curious #5 (permalink) Sat Nov 03, 2012 16:41 pm   Just curious
 

Thanks for the grammar correction.
You wrote:
....most of the English text books available to me are published by the Indians'. (correct)

(..... most of the English text books available to Nepal are published and printed in India.)

I mean to say -- I prefer "CV"or "Resume" to Bio-data.

"The students played and ate lunch at recess." = break, during the lunch break

Many thanks to you for pointing out my mistake in my every post. You really are a great and fast proofreader.
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Noren
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Posts: 1205
Location: NEPAL

Just curious #6 (permalink) Sat Nov 03, 2012 16:50 pm   Just curious
 

I consider you as one of my best language coaches. Your prompt reply to my post or problem amazes me.
_________________
A person who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything.
Noren
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 11 Oct 2008
Posts: 1205
Location: NEPAL

Just curious #7 (permalink) Sat Nov 03, 2012 17:28 pm   Just curious
 

Noren wrote:
I mean to say -- I prefer "CV"or "Resume" to Bio-data.

Ah, now I see that there's a disparity of usage
Biodata refers to biographical details in BrE/AmE, not to a CV.

There seems to be a similar disparity in the use of 'tiffin', so I guess the answer to your original question might be that while the terms you use might be familiar in Western society, they will not necessarily carry the same definition that they do in countries where 'Indian English' is the norm.
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