Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
to see with the eyes; to view; to notice; to discern; to observe
further
run
stay
sight
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular?



 
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
U18 - Is "U" the abbreviation of what word? | [t]he Canterbury Tales VERSUS [T]he Canterbury Tales
listening exercises
Message
Author
He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular? #1 (permalink) Fri Sep 08, 2006 2:35 am   He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular?
 

Hi teachers,

Please look at this pair of sentences.

He works 12-hour days.
He works 12 hours a day.

Is there any subtle difference?

Thanks in advance

Jupiter
Jupiter
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 15 Dec 2005
Posts: 215
Location: Cambodia

He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular? #2 (permalink) Fri Sep 08, 2006 4:23 am   He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular?
 

Quote:
He works 12-hour days.
He works 12 hours a day.

Hi

12-hour days sounds like days consist of 12 hours only instead of twenty four hours, i.e, 12- hours is adjective and days noun.. It is just like one-year diploma, I think. The second one seems natural to me.
Tom
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2148

How do you use the English Prepositions correctly?English grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Sign up for FREE and explore English! Click to subscribe to email English course
He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular? #3 (permalink) Fri Sep 08, 2006 6:51 am   He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular?
 

And I agre with Tom. The second one makes sense.
Pamela
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 14 Mar 2006
Posts: 1269
Location: RF

He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular? #4 (permalink) Fri Sep 08, 2006 7:27 am   He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular?
 

I'm afraid I have to disagree with Tom and Pamela. ;)

Both sentences mean the same thing and both are normal sentences.

Amy
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular? #5 (permalink) Fri Sep 08, 2006 7:52 am   He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular?
 

:oops: Having reread the first sentence I see that I made a mistake.
Pamela
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 14 Mar 2006
Posts: 1269
Location: RF

He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular? #6 (permalink) Fri Sep 08, 2006 8:38 am   He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular?
 

Thank you, Amy for once again enlightening me.

Could you please shed some more light on the first sentence? I still do not understand how it is correct! Is days adverbs here? Like he works days but I work nights, but then why 12- hour like an adjective?

Tom

Hi Pamela

...which is why I do not give my shallow opinions on other people's queries--just to save myself some face! :oops: You hastened to agree with me! :lol:

Tom
Tom
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2148

He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular? #7 (permalink) Fri Sep 08, 2006 8:53 am   He works 12-hour[s] days - plural or singular?
 

Hi Tom

"Work X-hour days" is idiomatic. The word day in the idiom refers only to a "workday". The length of a "workday" is the number of hours spent at work/at the company in a 24-hour period.

Amy
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

Display posts from previous:   
U18 - Is "U" the abbreviation of what word? | [t]he Canterbury Tales VERSUS [T]he Canterbury Tales
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
"However" versus "No matter"Meaning of "worry over"Expression: "Be it ever so..."Meaning of "in this light vein"Except vs. except forHe has yet to learn the past tenseA mixture of igniting vs. the ignition of a mixtureIt is raining VERSUS It has been rainingMind, it is a joke no longerA long full name of person in English LanguageThe verb go in a particular sentencePronunciation of Lucky SantangeloEver been 'critized'? (as opposed to 'criticized')

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail