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Going French (Part 6)


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Going French (Part 6) #1 (permalink) Sun Mar 10, 2013 18:18 pm   Going French (Part 6)
 

It's time for the next episode of Alan's essay called Going French.

TOEIC short conversations: Two employees talk about one of their former colleagues
Torsten
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Re: Going French (Part 6) #2 (permalink) Sun Mar 10, 2013 22:45 pm   Re: Going French (Part 6)
 

Hi

I love that coquettish timbered house in the first image, decorated with so many flowers.

The streets appear so quiet and so … empty. I supposed that the village in the picture was uninhabited. Like a museum. Or it was at lunch time on a hot Sunday.

Fortunately, in the end I found Alan’s description of the place: “usually sedate and relaxed environment”, and I madly liked the word “sedate” which explains everything.

I enjoyed the story. Thanks.

Monica
Monica28
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Joined: 09 Sep 2012
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Going French (Part 6) #3 (permalink) Tue Mar 12, 2013 23:13 pm   Going French (Part 6)
 

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Hello,

When I used to be child I had and I keep it till today a story-book by the brothers Grimm. Its illustration was full of timbered houses and, I imagined that these kind of houses are only in the tales.

Later I have been to Germany, and I was in Steinau also so I saw the house where the brothers Grimm lived.

These thoughts ran over my mind when I was reading Alan's story. He says: "As the region is so near to Germany and Switzerland, there are many timbered houses ". The expression "the timbered houses " arrested my attention and took me away in my childhood to my story-book. It is interesting that later I saw timbered houses, but not those ones came into my mind but always the illustrations of my story-book.

Unfortunately, I saw France partly, I have never been lot of places so in this part of France either.

Many thanks that Alan gave me an imaginary travel. I really set off Hungary from a beautiful winery place of Hungary its name Hajós where you can seen the most old row of wine cellars in Hungary and in Europe.


After I went to some German towns where I have really been so I admired my memory-towns. Steinau where I saw the house where the Brothers Grimm had lived. To see this house no wonder the illustrations of my story-book.

Steinau house where the brothers Grimm lived


After I passed over the Geman-French border, and I joined the tourist group and I sat me also on different miniature trains that meandered through the streets of the different towns round .I admired these French villages with the medieval buildings,every village has its different flowers à la mode. We were lucky because the sun shined everywhere.
On every house was a sign: "Vente de vin" in English also "selling of wine" and we could taste it ‘degustation’ was à la mode also.

What a pity that Alan couldn't enjoy the "dégustation" when he was driving because the French 'flics' are very keen to stop those ones who drinking and driving. What a wonderful to have a sat nav which took us a very small village what look liked as a small terrace house. Unbelievably amicable white haired women came to us, she received us as if we had been her old friends. This little village could be safe place because her gate wasn't closed but wide-open.
Immediately I remember the village where we have been living for 45 years. I never closed the doors either day and night. There used to be a 'humorous' saying in the village among the inhabitants:' I keep opened my gate it might bring in something good.' 'ha-ha-ha' they laughed at own good humour-sense. Since the time changed. Now everywhere held in cameras, burglar alarms etc.

Every villages and vineyards were so calmed and relaxed that we admired there are so
quiet places where the people don't know the excitement.

But on the last morning when we were saying goodbye to our hotelier - as like a bolt out of the blue - five American girls broke the silence and they claimed the breakfast after breakfast time. Right away the hotelier replenished his food and drink supplies and the quantities were larger than we had seen the whole week.

He perhaps get frightened from their uproar; - as it reminded me a picture what really happened to us, once we were sitting in a passage drinking coffee, and it was silence and once a German yelled to his friends "Hans" , his voice echoed in the passage,everybody got frightened as we would have been in a cinema and watching a WWII film. We never could forget. Because they broke the silence. This is a crime.

Here is an old half- timbered house in Hungary. Today it is a curiosity.

_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
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Joined: 26 Nov 2009
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Going French (Part 6) #4 (permalink) Wed Mar 13, 2013 12:07 pm   Going French (Part 6)
 

Hello Bez,

This one is brand new.

Regards: Kati
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Going French (Part 6) #5 (permalink) Sat Mar 16, 2013 13:55 pm   Going French (Part 6)
 

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Hello Torsten,

Many thanks for the 6.part of Going to France. I believed that accidentally I didn't receive this part because once I saw written under, in blue letters: "Going to France 6.part" I opened and really Monica's letter was already there.

I am sorry.

Regards:
Kati
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Going French (Part 6) #6 (permalink) Sun Mar 17, 2013 9:05 am   Going French (Part 6)
 

Brilliant as usual. Pleasantly descriptive and humorous. And so much different from my experience of France. We've only been there once, in Paris to be exact, and the only time we ate properly was one evening in a cabaret. I believe there's a vast number of places in Paris where you can pumper youself with delightful food and excellent service, but not if you have my wife at your side. She had definitely determined to explore every existing attraction of the town and, of course, failed. But as a result we'd lived the whole week on sandwiches and peanuts, eating on buses and other forms of public transport. On the last day I could hardly drag her out of Disneyland. Some ten minutes later and we would have missed our train. I'm not sure how many kilos I lost but, anyway, it was a memorable journey. One curious thing about it was how the locals could instantly recognise us as Russians. As I remember, we were perfectly sober and I wasn't wearing my budyonovka and carrying my balalayka. Anyway, even if we were walking silent, street vendors came up to us and started to foist off their eiffeltowershaped trinkets in almost perfect Russian. Once, as we were passing a kind of a lunchcounter on the street, the seller greeted us 'bonjour', on which I replied 'Hi'. He lifted his eyebrows and said 'Russkie?!'. I bought a couple of sandwiches from him, just out of astonishment. The only ones who mistook us were our native Russians. It was about 11 p.m. and the streets were empty. We stopped by the road as the trafficlights showed red. It's not as if we're extremely law-abiding but we glimpsed a couple of policemen on the other side. From the rear approached a company of a little boozy Russians. They stood for some while and then one said (in Russian, naturally) something like 'No traffic and they're staying. What people!' I replied, also in Russian, something like 'Yeah. That's for sure'. He hiccupped a couple of times and the rest began to snicker. A bit later they caught up with us and asked if we knew the way to their hotel. We did, but as we were pretty exhausted and not eager to follow our acquaintance, we didn't guide them but just explained how to get there. And that was the end of the story.
Kanol
You can meet me at english-test.net


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Going French (Part 6) #7 (permalink) Sun Mar 17, 2013 9:57 am   Going French (Part 6)
 

Hi Alan,

Many thanks for this fantastic natural pictures. They add very much to my imagination, and make the journey more attractive and interesting.
Mona Rmzi
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 18 Sep 2009
Posts: 165

Going French (Part 6) #8 (permalink) Sun Mar 17, 2013 12:01 pm   Going French (Part 6)
 

Hello Kanol,

I congratulate on your writing. It is very good. You say: "One curious thing about it was how the locals could instantly recognise us as Russians." I recognised from your style that you grew up on the Russian literature. I liked your writing that I tried to translate into Hungarian. What turning expressions you use. I like them all.
Only one: . "One curious thing about it was how the locals could instantly recognise us as Russians .As I remember, we were perfectly sober and I wasn't wearing my budyonovka and carrying my balalayka. " I enjoy your story very much.

Do the others know what budyonovka is. Budenovka (Russian: Будёновка, tr. budyonovka; IPA: [bʊˈdʲɵnəfkə]) is a distinctive type of hat and an essential part of the communist uniform of the Russian Civil War and later.







Many thanks.

Kati
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Going French (Part 6) #9 (permalink) Sun Mar 17, 2013 14:33 pm   Going French (Part 6)
 

Kati, you just keep on flattering me merely out of your sweet nature :)
In fact, literature didn't used to be my strongest point in school and if I occasinally got an excellent mark for an essay, that was only because my Mum took over it.
Anyway, thank you enormously. It does give me a certain confidence.
Kanol
You can meet me at english-test.net


Joined: 05 Mar 2013
Posts: 54
Location: Russia

Going French (Part 6) #10 (permalink) Sun Mar 17, 2013 14:52 pm   Going French (Part 6)
 

Hello, I never flatter to anybody, you have to have confidence in yourself . I translated because I liked it very much and I wanted to read it to my husband who also enjoyed very much. Bye: Kati
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Going French (Part 6) #11 (permalink) Wed Mar 20, 2013 14:34 pm   Going French (Part 6)
 

Beautiful narration Alan. I'm flabbergasted to see how beautifully you put the words in use. Will I be ever near just a scintilla of you?
Ajay Nahta
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 06 Oct 2011
Posts: 130
Location: India

Going French (Part 6) #12 (permalink) Wed Mar 20, 2013 16:53 pm   Going French (Part 6)
 

Dear Ajai,

You can see that the number of my letters. I can't say how many times I wrote the same thing to Alan. I never forgot when I read his first essay. I felt the same and I wrote to him me also not once. His essays are enjoyable and authentic that we can read a very good literature. I ordered his essays also, and I printed them. I say to everybody here in Hungary that we are very lucky all, that we can learn on this standard what he gives us. If he answers us in two lines it is "brilliant and humorous."

I was very happy when Kanol began his letter concisely: "Brilliant as usual. Pleasantly descriptive and humorous."

I was happy that he says just as we say. I told myself if somebody who can write so well than Kanol and praises him in the same way as us, this can be very good for Alan also. As my husband is an artist painter when he received a characteristic praise from one of his talented students he was happier when he received a good critique from an art-historian.

I say - till today - when another artist gives evidence of his art in his favour I am happier when somebody tells something good in that way that I see that he/she doesn't see the essence of his painting.

I can say that you also told how beautifully he put the words in use and how wonderfully he could describe and express everything. I agree with you also.

Bye:
Kati
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Introduction #13 (permalink) Thu Mar 21, 2013 9:31 am   Introduction
 

Hello Everyone! My name is Archana. I am from India. I am please to join this forum & excited to learn english..
Archana 2012
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Going French (Part 6) #14 (permalink) Thu Mar 21, 2013 10:33 am   Going French (Part 6)
 

Hi Kati,

You make me blush. I am almost become a tomato.

Alan
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Going French (Part 6) #15 (permalink) Thu Mar 21, 2013 10:55 am   Going French (Part 6)
 

Kati Svaby wrote:
Dear Ajai,

You can see that the number of my letters. I can't say how many times I wrote the same thing to Alan. I never forgot when I read his first essay. I felt the same and I wrote to him me also not once. His essays are enjoyable and authentic that we can read a very good literature. I ordered his essays also, and I printed them. I say to everybody here in Hungary that we are very lucky all, that we can learn on this standard what he gives us. If he answers us in two lines it is "brilliant and humorous."

I was very happy when Kanol began his letter concisely: "Brilliant as usual. Pleasantly descriptive and humorous."

I was happy that he says just as we say. I told myself if somebody who can write so well than Kanol and praises him in the same way as us, this can be very good for Alan also. As my husband is an artist painter when he received a characteristic praise from one of his talented students he was happier when he received a good critique from an art-historian.

I say - till today - when another artist gives evidence of his art in his favour I am happier when somebody tells something good in that way that I see that he/she doesn't see the essence of his painting.

I can say that you also told how beautifully he put the words in use and how wonderfully he could describe and express everything. I agree with you also.

Bye:
Kati

Kati,
you are a prolific writer and I hope probably you are a indefatigable speaker too. You have a knack of explaining a simple thing in so many words. You know, I find it to be a very difficult task to express myself in loquacious way. Weather you believe or not, your flow is commendable. And you can even make Alan blush with your rhetoric.
Ajay Nahta
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 06 Oct 2011
Posts: 130
Location: India

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