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rain is going to gradually stop



 
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Dread to do vs. dread doing | Introducing to the boss for the first time
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rain is going to gradually stop #1 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 8:13 am   rain is going to gradually stop
 

It is all about raining which is going to gradually stop.
Are there any other ways to say the sentences below but not using the phrasal verb "ease off".

Rain's begun to ease off.
Seems as if the rain is easing off.
Seems as if the rain is going to ease off.

weaken, decline,fade, ..?

Thanks
E2e4
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rain is going to gradually stop #2 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 9:47 am   rain is going to gradually stop
 

First of all, your sentences all lack something, either an article or a subject:

The rain's begun to ease off.
It seems as if the rain is easing off.
It seems as if the rain is going to ease off.

'Easing off' is the most appropriate form and I cannot think of an example which works as well as that. You could say
The rain's not so heavy
which sounds more natural than
the rain's getting lighter.
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rain is going to gradually stop #3 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 11:21 am   rain is going to gradually stop
 

Would it then be appropriate to say

1) Huh, what a pouring, but it seems as though the rain's getting lighter now.

2) Huh, what a pouring, but it seems as though getting lighter now.

Are there any other words which can be used in such case? (after pouring)

Thanks again
E2e4
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rain is going to gradually stop #4 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 11:55 am   rain is going to gradually stop
 

'what a pouring' is not appropriate.

You could use 'what a pour-down'
Huh, what a pour-down, but it seems as though the rain's getting lighter now.
Huh, what a pour-down, but it seems as though it's getting lighter now.
Huh, what a pour-down, but it/the rain seems to be getting lighter now.
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rain is going to gradually stop #5 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 12:34 pm   rain is going to gradually stop
 

Beeesneees wrote:
'what a pouring' is not appropriate.

You could use 'what a pour-down'
Huh, what a pour-down, but it seems as though the rain's getting lighter now.
Huh, what a pour-down, but it seems as though it's getting lighter now.
Huh, what a pour-down, but it/the rain seems to be getting lighter now.

In the US, gullywashers aren't pour-downs, they are downpours,

Rains may subside.

I've heard people say that the rain is ebbing, but that usage of "to ebb" makes my skin crawl.
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rain is going to gradually stop #6 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 13:10 pm   rain is going to gradually stop
 

If a down-pour with lighting is about to subside, can I say that "it seems the cats and dogs is (are) dying down now".

Thanks
E2e4
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rain is going to gradually stop #7 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 14:16 pm   rain is going to gradually stop
 

SteveThomas wrote:
In the US, gullywashers aren't pour-downs, they are downpours,

Hah! Thanks Steve. That's actually what I meant!
I think I sug=ffered some sort of brain dump!
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rain is going to gradually stop #8 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 15:49 pm   rain is going to gradually stop
 

E2e4 wrote:
If a down-pour with lighting is about to subside, can I say that "it seems the cats and dogs is (are) dying down now".

Thanks

No, that doesn't really make any sense.
You can't rearrange the idiom 'raining cats and dogs'.
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rain is going to gradually stop #9 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 16:30 pm   rain is going to gradually stop
 

Can't I invent a new idiom? You for sure have got what I meant.
"The cats and dogs are dying down." Let's go!

"The cats and dogs are dying down." is now a new idiom. He he, just wait the confirmation by people all over the world in a decade or two. Thanks

P.S. don't be angry with me for I am an innovative person.
E2e4
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rain is going to gradually stop #10 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 17:46 pm   rain is going to gradually stop
 

Well done on the innovation.
I predict it won't catch on.
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rain is going to gradually stop #11 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 9:08 am   rain is going to gradually stop
 

I wonder if you can apply 'petering out' to rain (like conversation) figuratively.
Eugene2114
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rain is going to gradually stop #12 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 9:14 am   rain is going to gradually stop
 

If you mean something like:
The rasin petered out gradually.
The rain seems to be petering out now.
Then yes, those work.

Good thinking.
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