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forget vs forget about



 
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
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forget vs forget about #1 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 12:24 pm   forget vs forget about
 

Hi teachers,
I have read this explanation on your forum. I really don't know when it was and I have added myself 'omit' in that. Do you agree?
'Forget' on its own simply means 'not remember'. I forgot my password - Have you forgotten your password?
When you add 'about', you are talking more generally to suggest 'dismiss/remove/omit from your memory.

Examples:
A I have forgotten my password.
B Don't you remember that you put all your passwords on a sheet of paper?
A Yes, you're right. I'd forgotten about that.

This one is mine. Is it correct?
Would 'forget about' also mean 'stop thinking about'?
He only wanted to sleep and forget about (stop thinking about) what happened at work.

Thanks.
Readytolearn
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 05 Apr 2013
Posts: 654

Re: forget vs forget about #2 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 12:47 pm   Re: forget vs forget about
 

Readytolearn wrote:


This one is mine. Is it correct?
Would 'forget about' also mean 'stop thinking about'?
He only wanted to sleep and forget about (stop thinking about) what happened at work.

Thanks.

Yes.

To forget something is to no longer have the information in your head when you think about it.
To forget about something is to not have it in your thoughts.

My mother gave me her recipe for potato salad, but I forget where I put it.
Oh, shoot! Tonight I was supposed to pick up Donna and take her to the meeting with me,but I forgot about it.
SteveThomas
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 16 Mar 2013
Posts: 281

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forget vs forget about #3 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 12:53 pm   forget vs forget about
 

Hi Steve Thomas,
Thanks a lot for your reply. It is indeed very helpful!
Is it also correct to add 'omit' in that definition?

RtL
Readytolearn
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 05 Apr 2013
Posts: 654

forget vs forget about #4 (permalink) Fri Apr 05, 2013 12:55 pm   forget vs forget about
 

In "He only wanted to sleep and forget about what happened at work", you can say that "forget about" means "dismiss from your memory". I don't really see any need to add a new definition "omit from your memory" for that case, and, anyway, "omit" does not seem to be quite the right verb for the context. To be honest, I don't think the explanation you quote about "talking more generally to suggest dismiss/remove/omit from your memory" very satisfactorily captures the difference anyway.

There is less difference between "forget" and "forget about" in your example than in the password example (though still a slight difference in nuance).
Dozy
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 17 Jun 2011
Posts: 7027
Location: UK

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