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to get one over on



 
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
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to get one over on #1 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 12:36 pm   to get one over on
 

Hi,
I guess he's eager to prove those who sacked him were wrong (he now faces his former club), still don't completely work out the "to get one over on" construction (= get a win over [Southampton]--?) :

"You would think Nigel Adkins [coach] would love Southampton after his sacking in January."
Thank you.
Eugene2114
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to get one over on #2 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 12:37 pm   to get one over on
 

Sorry, it should read, "You would think Nigel Adkins [coach] would love to get one over on Southampton after his sacking in January."
Eugene2114
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to get one over on #3 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 12:59 pm   to get one over on
 

"get one over (on someone)" means to trick, defeat, gain an advantage, etc. In this context it probably refers to getting a win over Southampton as you say (however, "get one over" is a general set expression, not perceived as a replacement of "a win" with "one").
Dozy
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to get one over on #4 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 13:56 pm   to get one over on
 

Thanks Dozy.
Almost a one-off when Macmillan was outdone by another dic (the OALD) on which I capitalized by picking up 'go one better (than somebody/something)'. If I said, "You would think Nigel Adkins would love to go one better with Reading than with Southampton.", would it imply the same just put differently?
Eugene2114
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Joined: 22 Dec 2010
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to get one over on #5 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 14:44 pm   to get one over on
 

It's not really the same. "You would think Nigel Adkins would love to go one better with Reading than with Southampton" means that he would love to achieve more as manager of Reading than he did as manager of Southampton. It is not specifically about gaining advantage over Southampton or winning a match against Southampton.

By the way Eugene, sorry if I've asked before and forgotten, but for interest whereabouts in the world are you?
Dozy
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to get one over on #6 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 14:57 pm   to get one over on
 

Yes, I can see the difference in the two meanings now (the latter probably giving deeper satisfaction to him as manager). -;)

You've not asked Dozy, it's Kiev, Ukraine, perhaps a two-hour flight away..
Eugene2114
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Joined: 22 Dec 2010
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to get one over on #7 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 18:42 pm   to get one over on
 

Hmm, I think we (= England) are playing you again in the autumn, right? Hopefully we can do a bit better than last time...
Dozy
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to get one over on #8 (permalink) Sun Apr 07, 2013 14:40 pm   to get one over on
 

Dozy wrote:
Hmm, I think we (= England) are playing you again in the autumn, right? Hopefully we can do a bit better than last time...

Yes, I wouldn't mind it surpassing the previous encounter to end in a 3-3. Come on England/Ukraine!
What is nagging me at the moment though, is: "Tottenham v Everton. Both sides missing players, got 1-1 written all over it." "Written all over it" means the result predicted is supposedly due to the approximately equal losses in both teams?
Eugene2114
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Joined: 22 Dec 2010
Posts: 2998

to get one over on #9 (permalink) Sun Apr 07, 2013 14:54 pm   to get one over on
 

1-1 is strongly predicted/expected. This prediction seems to be associated with the fact that both sides are missing players, though I don't personally understand why that should lead to a 1-1 scoreline.
Dozy
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Joined: 17 Jun 2011
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Location: UK

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