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to impede; to obstruct; to hinder; to meddle
pretend
margin
interfere
tie
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Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?]



 
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Past perfect vs. Past simple | Thanks in advance VERSUS Thanks beforehand
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Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?] #1 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 17:39 pm   Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?]
 

Hi teachers,
Would 'maintain this information in your memory' be an appropriate definition for 'remember' in the following context?
Information: Mr. White is the owner of the bookstore.
Context:
Mrs. Elsie: Mr. White, has my book of A History of Germany come in yet? Because I've been waiting for my book for two weeks and Peter, your bookseller, told me maximum in a week. Do you remember, (maintain this information in your memory) Peter?
Peter: Yes, I do madam.

Thanks
Readytolearn
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Joined: 05 Apr 2013
Posts: 654

Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?] #2 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 18:34 pm   Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?]
 

It's intelligible, but "maintain" is probably not the optimum verb. I think "retain" would be better.

Some other random things:
"Elsie" is usually a first name, in which case you wouldn't say "Mrs Elsie".
Assuming "A History of Germany" is the actual name of the book, you should delete the word"of" before it.
Normally one would not repeat "my book" in the second sentence. Normally one would say "I've been waiting for it for two weeks" or just "I've been waiting for two weeks".
"told me maximum in a week" is not right. I think you mean "told me a maximum of a week".
Dozy
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Joined: 17 Jun 2011
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Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?] #3 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 18:52 pm   Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?]
 

Hi Dozy,
Thanks a lot for your reply, suggestions, and corrections.
Assuming "A History of Germany" is the actual name of the book, you should delete the word"of" before it. Wow! I didn't know that. Then it should be 'A History Germany'?
Normally one would not repeat "my book" in the second sentence. Normally one would say "I've been waiting for it for two weeks" or just "I've been waiting for two weeks".
Yes, you are right! What if it is written like that just for emphasis. Could it be possible?

RtL
Readytolearn
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 05 Apr 2013
Posts: 654

Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?] #4 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 19:52 pm   Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?]
 

Hello RtL,

You have misunderstood what Dozy told you and omitted the wrong 'of'.
You must include the 'of' in 'A History of Germany'.
Please compare:
Mr. White, has my book of A History of Germany come in yet? - incorrect
Mr. White, has my book, "A History of Germany," come in yet?

Mr. White, has my book, "A History of Germany," come in yet? I've been waiting for it for two weeks and Peter, your bookseller, told me it would take a maximum of one week. Do you remember, Peter?
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Beeesneees
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Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?] #5 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 20:02 pm   Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?]
 

Readytolearn wrote:
Normally one would say "I've been waiting for it for two weeks" or just "I've been waiting for two weeks".
Yes, you are right! What if it is written like that just for emphasis. Could it be possible?
Yes, it's possible.
Dozy
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 17 Jun 2011
Posts: 7027
Location: UK

Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?] #6 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 20:28 pm   Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?]
 

Hi everybody,
I my Idea, instead of "maintain" we can use "recall". also, "retrieval" is true, but "recall" would be better
Recall the information from your memory
Asg
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 26 Aug 2011
Posts: 21

Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?] #7 (permalink) Sat Apr 06, 2013 20:30 pm   Maintain this information in your memory [Definition for remember?]
 

Hi Beeesneees,
I have certainly misunderstood her. Thanks a lot for your help and comments.
I appreciate them.

RtL
Readytolearn
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 05 Apr 2013
Posts: 654

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