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relation/relationship



 
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
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relation/relationship #1 (permalink) Sun Apr 07, 2013 13:57 pm   relation/relationship
 

Hello!
I would really like to know what is the difference between 'relation' and 'relationship'? so the importance of this suffix: ship what does the suffix 'ship' change, in fact?
Thank you for your time!
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relation/relationship #2 (permalink) Mon Apr 08, 2013 1:40 am   relation/relationship
 

The -ship suffix normally indicates a condition. Originally, the person you had a connection to was a relation, and the connection was a relationship.

Over the years, the oerson you have a connection to has become a relation only if you are members of the same family, while people have used relation as a synonym of relationship.

I can't think of any time when you can't use relation instead of relationship, although there are obviously times you cannot use relationship for relation.
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relation/relationship #3 (permalink) Mon Apr 08, 2013 8:32 am   relation/relationship
 

Then, what can be the difference between 'relative' and 'relation'?
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relation/relationship #4 (permalink) Mon Apr 08, 2013 9:13 am   relation/relationship
 

Hi THL,

The problem with these two words 'relative' and 'relation' is that they have as it were 'different lives'. 'Relative' can be both noun and adjective and 'relation' can be either a member of the family or a connection, often used in the plural. Thinking about the two words used to describe a member of the family, I would say that 'relative' suggests someone in the immediate family and 'relation' could be someone more remote. This is of course a very general distinction but you would tend to say: A close relative of the family has just got married/A distant relation of hers has just died and left her a house in the heart of the country.

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relation/relationship #5 (permalink) Mon Apr 08, 2013 9:20 am   relation/relationship
 

Hi THL,

The problem with these two words 'relative' and 'relation' is that they have as it were 'different lives'. 'Relative' can be both noun and adjective and 'relation' can be either a member of the family or a connection, often used in the plural. Thinking about the two words used to describe a member of the family, I would say that 'relative' suggests someone in the immediate family and 'relation' could be someone more remote. This is of course a very general distinction but you would tend to say: A close relative of the family has just got married/A distant relative of hers has just died and left her a house in the heart of the country.

Alan
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relation/relationship #6 (permalink) Mon Apr 08, 2013 15:58 pm   relation/relationship
 

Alan wrote:
Thinking about the two words used to describe a member of the family, I would say that 'relative' suggests someone in the immediate family and 'relation' could be someone more remote. Alan

Thank you, Alan.
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