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to be forced from something



 
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
grandstand finish | Definition on Might/May [Which one is more appropriate?]
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to be forced from something #1 (permalink) Wed Apr 10, 2013 7:17 am   to be forced from something
 

More than 300,000 people have been forced from their homes by fighting in the north in the past few years, 60 per cent of them children.
I think I understand the meaning of the sentence but the using of "to be forced from" is confusing me.
I have consulted many dictionaries but none of them list the phrase.
I would write it as follows?
More than 300,000 people have been forced to leave their homes by fighting in the north in the past few years, 60 per cent of them children.
How about my version? Is it also correct?
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to be forced from something #2 (permalink) Wed Apr 10, 2013 8:19 am   to be forced from something
 

yes :)
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to be forced from something #3 (permalink) Wed Apr 10, 2013 8:54 am   to be forced from something
 

By the way, Macmillan's explanation seems quite clear to me:

"if an event or situation forces you to do something, you have to do it even if you do not want to

force someone to do something: Bad health forced her to abandon her studies.
force someone into/out of something: Lack of skills forces these young men into low-paid jobs.
Falling sales eventually forced them out of business."

--So you may be forced into/out of/from something as well as forced to do something.
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to be forced from something #4 (permalink) Wed Apr 10, 2013 13:45 pm   to be forced from something
 

Beeesneees,
"More than 300,000 people have been forced to leave their homes for fighting in the north in the past few years, 60 per cent of them children."
Is it not correct? I have replaced 'by' with 'for'.
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to be forced from something #5 (permalink) Wed Apr 10, 2013 16:44 pm   to be forced from something
 

It is not correct.
They weren't the ones doing the fighting, so you cannot use 'for'.
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to be forced from something #6 (permalink) Wed Apr 10, 2013 17:42 pm   to be forced from something
 

Beeesneees,
1. "More than 300,000 people have been forced to leave their homes by invading army."
Is it correct?
2. The army forced many people out of town and occupied the town.
3. The invading army forced the people into hiding in the forest.
Are the above correct?
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to be forced from something #7 (permalink) Wed Apr 10, 2013 19:26 pm   to be forced from something
 

1. It would have to be 'by the invading army' but it alters the meaning in that this implies that the army directly interacted with the people and forced them out of their homes.
2 and 3 are correct with the same meaning.
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