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trip in a vehicle; type of computer hardware; combined effort to accomplish a goal (i.e. fund raiser)
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your or their



 
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
I would hope that demonstrations | ambiguous sentences
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your or their #1 (permalink) Wed Apr 10, 2013 9:07 am   your or their
 

1 Growing your own vegetables also, of course, saves many people a lot of money.
2 Growing their own vegetables also, of course, saves many people a lot of money.
3 Growing their own vegetables also, of course, save many people a lot of money.

Is "your" possible to be substituted with "their"? Does it then ask for "save" instead of "saves"? Thanks
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your or their #2 (permalink) Wed Apr 10, 2013 16:35 pm   your or their
 

It's possible to say 'growing your own vegetables - but then you should also say 'saves you a lot of money'.
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I would hope that demonstrations | ambiguous sentences
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