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Expression "good luck"



 
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Expression "good luck" #1 (permalink) Wed Oct 04, 2006 2:44 am   Expression "good luck"
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #29 "Responses (2)", question 9

Mike: 'I'm taking my driving test tomorrow.'
Jane: '.........'

(a) Good fortune.
(b) Good luck.
(c) Good outcome.
(d) Good success.

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #29 "Responses (2)", answer 9

Mike: 'I'm taking my driving test tomorrow.'
Jane: 'Good luck.'

Correct answer: (b) Good luck.

Your answer was: incorrect
Mike: 'I'm taking my driving test tomorrow.'
Jane: 'Good success.'
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I wonder why is not answer "Good success". Because I think good luck means is passive hope.
and good success means "I believe you'll past your exam".
Could you explain more for me, Thank you.

Dong
Dongi
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Expression: "good luck" #2 (permalink) Wed Oct 04, 2006 7:42 am   Expression: "good luck"
 

Hi Dong,

The usual expression when you want to express to someone your good wishes before an exam, for example is: Good luck. If you want to use the word success/successful, then you would say; I wish you every success or I hope you are successful.

Alan
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Expression "good luck" #3 (permalink) Sun Jan 03, 2010 16:15 pm   Expression "good luck"
 

thanks alan for showing us how good you are in english i'm trying to work hard to become like you , i know that's not that easy but i believe by working hard i'll be what i want to be .

charl.
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Expression "good luck" #4 (permalink) Sat Jan 12, 2013 21:38 pm   Expression "good luck"
 

Before any exams its bettet to say good luck
So When are we allawed to say good fortune?
please make me some exampls
Tanks in advance
Niloufar1
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Expression "good luck" #5 (permalink) Sun Jan 13, 2013 0:23 am   Expression "good luck"
 

I would never wish anyone 'good fortune' in any circumstances.
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Expression "good luck" #6 (permalink) Mon Jan 14, 2013 0:14 am   Expression "good luck"
 

Before any exams its bettet to say good luck
So When are we allawed to say good fortune?
please make me some exampls
Tanks in advance
Niloufar1
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 15 Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Location: Iran

Expression "good luck" #7 (permalink) Mon Jan 14, 2013 0:23 am   Expression "good luck"
 

I havent understood the difference between good luck and good fortune yet
please help me with it
Niloufar1
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 15 Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Location: Iran

Expression "good luck" #8 (permalink) Mon Jan 14, 2013 8:25 am   Expression "good luck"
 

There isn't really a difference, because 'luck' and 'fortune' mean the same thing. However, native English speakers do not ten to use 'Good fortune' as a greeting.
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