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after all others; finally; at the end; most recently
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Expression "Jump all over"



 
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Expression "Jump all over" #1 (permalink) Wed Oct 04, 2006 7:47 am   Expression "Jump all over"
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #194 "Phrasal Verbs (H to L)", question 4

Kevin ......... the great opportunity to be the floor manager.

(a) jumped all over
(b) jumped in
(c) jumped over

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #194 "Phrasal Verbs (H to L)", answer 4

Kevin jumped all over the great opportunity to be the floor manager.

Correct answer: (a) jumped all over

Your answer was: incorrect
Kevin jumped in the great opportunity to be the floor manager.
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I don't understand what does it mean "jump all over"; I couldn't find it in my dictionary (Collins Cobuild).
Thanks.

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Expression: "Jump all over" #2 (permalink) Wed Oct 04, 2006 8:02 am   Expression: "Jump all over"
 

.
Well, unfortunately if you use the ONE LOOK DICTIONARY SEARCH, it locates only another meaning of this phrasal idiom. Jump all over also means (as here) eagerly accept / enthusiastically take advantage of.
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Expression "Jump all over" #3 (permalink) Tue Dec 05, 2006 9:30 am   Expression "Jump all over"
 

I searched the idiom with all available resources too only to get the unfortunate results as well. Every dictionary I have in hand says unanimously it means 'to criticize someone severely'.

Anyway, is it here = jump at?

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Expression "Jump all over" #4 (permalink) Tue Dec 05, 2006 10:07 am   Expression "Jump all over"
 

.
Yes--'jump' at would work well in this sentence.
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Expression "Jump all over" #5 (permalink) Sat Feb 09, 2013 18:06 pm   Expression "Jump all over"
 

What's the difference between jump over and jump all over.
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Expression "Jump all over" #6 (permalink) Sun Feb 10, 2013 10:22 am   Expression "Jump all over"
 

'Jump over' suggests jump (leap) from one side of something to the other side: A horse jumps over a fence as it gallops round the course in a race. 'Jump all over' often has the sense of welcoming someone in an enthusiastic way. Its use at *1 above in the test is a little unusual and as has been pointed out, it would be better to use 'jump at' suggesting grasping an opportunity very quickly.

Alan
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Expression "Jump all over" #7 (permalink) Mon Feb 11, 2013 6:51 am   Expression "Jump all over"
 

Alan[/quote]Alan, even the dictionary does not give a better explanation than you. Thanks a lot. Will it be right, " I jumped all over seeing your fantastic explanation in the mail box".
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