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Meaning of "go Dutch"



 
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Meaning of "go Dutch" #1 (permalink) Fri Oct 13, 2006 10:21 am   Meaning of "go Dutch"
 

English Idioms and Expressions, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #20 "English Idioms and Phrases", question 4

I invited a friend to go to a street market by my house where they served some real good Japanese food. My friend's mom wanted to pay for her daughter's meal, but I insisted on paying for both our meals myself, her mom finally said: Ok, as long as we go Dutch next time.

(a) I pay for your meal
(b) you take me with you
(c) you let me drive you there
(d) we divide the costs

English Idioms and Expressions, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #20 "English Idioms and Phrases", answer 4

I invited a friend to go to a street market by my house where they served some real good Japanese food. My friend's mom wanted to pay for her daughter's meal, but I insisted on paying for both our meals myself, her mom finally said: Ok, as long as we we divide the costs next time.

Correct answer: (d) we divide the costs
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Hi! What does it mean "Dutch"?
1-a behaviour like Holland, when each of peaple pay for themselves or 2-her mom want to pay for his meal?

Thanks
Shamil
Shamil
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Meaning of "go Dutch" #2 (permalink) Fri Oct 13, 2006 14:07 pm   Meaning of "go Dutch"
 

.
Dutch treat: An outing or date in which each person pays his or her own expenses. For example, Her parents agreed that she might date if it were a Dutch treat. The related expression go Dutch means "to go on a date with each person paying their own way," as in Students often elect to go Dutch. The first term dates from about 1870, and the variant from the early 1900s.

I am not sure, however, that the term relates directly to social behavior in Holland.
.
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