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Hung vs. hanged


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Hung vs. hanged #1 (permalink) Mon Nov 29, 2004 0:44 am   Hung vs. hanged
 

Test No. errors/advan-3 "The audience went wild", question 3

Since the abolition of capital punishment in this country murderers are not hung if they are found guilty.

(a) abolition
(b) capital punishment
(c) hung
(d) guilty

Test No. errors/advan-3 "The audience went wild", answer 3

Since the abolition of capital punishment in this country murderers are not hanged if they are found guilty.

Correct entry: hanged
The error was: (c) hung
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Why is it "he was hanged" and not "he was hung?" When is hung right?

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Hanged/hung #2 (permalink) Mon Nov 29, 2004 10:45 am   Hanged/hung
 

The simple explanation of which past participle of the verb hang to use is that people are hanged by the neck and pictures are hung on the wall.
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Hanged/hung #3 (permalink) Mon Nov 29, 2004 18:36 pm   Hanged/hung
 

Alan wrote:
The simple explanation of which past participle of the verb hang to use is that people are hanged by the neck and pictures are hung on the wall.

Hi ALan! I cannot catch the difference between the 2 expressions.
Help me catch it!
Thanks a lot
Mariya
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Hanged/hung #4 (permalink) Mon Nov 29, 2004 19:32 pm   Hanged/hung
 

Simply hanged for people and hung for things.
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Is that because #5 (permalink) Thu Feb 10, 2005 2:22 am   Is that because
 

of the vulgar connoations of someone "being" hung? or because it was something established when the practice of hanging was still common ie: dialect, or period legal clause?
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Hung/hanged #6 (permalink) Thu Feb 10, 2005 9:48 am   Hung/hanged
 

Sorry, can you say again?
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Hang vs hung #7 (permalink) Thu Mar 24, 2005 19:26 pm   Hang vs hung
 

so it's hang for people and hung for animals? Thank you
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Hang #8 (permalink) Thu Mar 24, 2005 21:51 pm   Hang
 

There are two past forms for this verb:

hung and hanged. The first one simply means something as for example a picture on a wall and the second one means hanged by the neck.
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Hung vs. hanged #9 (permalink) Fri Jan 05, 2007 13:46 pm   Hung vs. hanged
 

Hung is used when the thing is hanging contineously for long time.(like a portrait on the wall). We can also say that:-
"The culprit was hanged and this corpse was hung on the tree."
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Hung vs. hanged #10 (permalink) Fri Jan 05, 2007 14:54 pm   Hung vs. hanged
 

or:

The culprit was hanged and his/her/the corpse was hung on the tree.

Unless there's more than one corpse, there's no need to use the modifier "this".
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Hung vs. hanged #11 (permalink) Thu Mar 06, 2008 3:52 am   Hung vs. hanged
 

hi Allan... i remember there are no such irregular/regular verb for hanged.... isnt it suppose to be hang- hung- hung...
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Hung vs. hanged #12 (permalink) Thu Mar 06, 2008 9:01 am   Hung vs. hanged
 

Hi, Nerd

Alan has stated that
There are two past forms for this verb:

hung and hanged. The first one simply means something as for example a picture on a wall and the second one means hanged by the neck.


It just so happens that to hang in its one meaning is a regular verb and in the other - irregular :)
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Hung vs. hanged #13 (permalink) Thu Mar 06, 2008 14:20 pm   Hung vs. hanged
 

ok then i know thanks
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Hung vs. hanged #14 (permalink) Thu Apr 10, 2008 15:11 pm   Hung vs. hanged
 

Another reason, besides the correctness, not to use "hung" as a verb when referring to people is that it's also a gender-specific vulgar adjective in reference to men. Most men would take it as complimentary, but it's still considered impolite in many circles.
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Hung vs. hanged #15 (permalink) Tue Nov 11, 2008 18:29 pm   Hung vs. hanged
 

Does the people vs. object rule apply when using the expression "hang out"?
For example, would you say "We hung out this weekend," because it sounds better, or "We hanged out this weekend," because you're dealing with people?
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