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Comparative Degree



 
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
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Comparative Degree #1 (permalink) Fri Oct 27, 2006 4:56 am   Comparative Degree
 

Hi, friends!!! Please read this following sentence:
"She's a zillion times brainier than I am."
How to use "times+adj(-er) than ....." in the comparative degree form? Can I say "She 's zillion times brainier than me?"

Thanks!
F.F
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The short answer #2 (permalink) Fri Oct 27, 2006 5:57 am   The short answer
 

Yes, you can if you add the a before zillion.
Canadian45
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Comparative Degree #3 (permalink) Fri Oct 27, 2006 6:04 am   Comparative Degree
 

Hi FangFang :D

Or you'd say "She's zillions of times brainier than me."

- hundreds of times more than
- two hundred times more than
- a (one) hundred times more than


Amy
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Comparative Degree #4 (permalink) Fri Oct 27, 2006 15:03 pm   Comparative Degree
 

Hi, Amy :) ,hi, canadian45. Thank you!
But I wonder why "me" could be used here, in fact, I am confused about it.
FangFang
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Than me vs. than I #5 (permalink) Fri Oct 27, 2006 23:42 pm   Than me vs. than I
 

FangFang wrote:
Hi, Amy :) ,hi, canadian45. Thank you!
But I wonder why "me" could be used here, in fact, I am confused about it.

Actually, 'than me' is informal English. According to some, 'than I (am)', is the correct phrase.
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..than me #6 (permalink) Fri Oct 27, 2006 23:53 pm   ..than me
 

Yes, the most grammatically correct way to say it is "......than I (am)".

However, it is very common for native speakers to say ".....than me", so "than me" has become accepted as also being correct.
Canadian45
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Comparative Degree #7 (permalink) Sat Oct 28, 2006 0:02 am   Comparative Degree
 

Hi Fang Fang

Yes, that's right. Using "than me" is a very normal, typical and widely used conversational style. Your sentence seems to be just right for it ;). If you want to be more formal, use your first sentence: "than I am."

Saying "than I" (in other words, without "am") would be extremely formal.

Amy
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