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Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"


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Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #61 (permalink) Tue May 07, 2013 8:44 am   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

PHRASAL VERBS - COMMUNICATION

to call up
meaning: to phone somebody
example: I’ll call him up later.

to put through
meaning: to connect by telephone
example: Could you put me through to the manager?

to put on
meaning: to give somebody the telephone
example: Hello Mrs. Maple. Could you put Tommy on?

to hold on / hang on
meaning: to stay connected on the phone line
example: I’ll check if there are any free tables for tonight. Please, hold on. -

to call/ring back
meaning: to return the call
example: I’m really busy. Can I call you back later?

to pick up
meaning: to receive a call
example: I stopped calling her because she never picks up the phone.

to phone around
meaning: to call many people, usually to find out information
example: I don’t know but I’ll phone around a couple of my friends and find out.

to listen in
meaning: to hear somebody else’s conversation
example: Do you also hear that strange noise? I think there is somebody listening in.
-
to cut off
meaning: to stop talking because the connection broke
example: He was just about to tell me his secret when we were cut off. -

to hang up / ring off
meaning: to end the conversation on the telephone
example: She talks for hours and always feel she will never hang up/ring off.

to ring in
meaning: to telephone your workplace to say why you’re not there
example: You should ring in sick if you feel so sick.

to hang up on somebody
meaning: to end the call while the other person is still talking
example: I must have said something bad again because she hung up on me.

"

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Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #62 (permalink) Tue May 07, 2013 13:35 pm   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

PHRASAL VERBS - SECRETS AND LIES

to add up
meaning: to make sense
example: At first I had no idea why he was so secretive, but then it started adding up.

to back up
meaning: to support, to say something is true
example: They didn’t believe me until he backed up my story.

to blurt out
meaning: to say without thinking
example: He simply can’t lie, he always blurts out the truth.

to clam up
meaning: to refuse to speak
example: He clammed up as soon as I asked him to tell me what really happened.

to dig up-
meaning: to search for and find something
example: He dug up the truth in the end. .

to fall for
meaning: to believe something and be tricked
example: How could she have fallen for his lies?

to ferret out
meaning: to find out through hard work
example: I thought it was a secret until the reporter ferreted it out.

to figure out
meaning: to manage to understand (on your own)
example: You didn’t want to tell me what happened but I figured it out.

to give away
meaning: to reveal (a secret)
example: I begged him for hours but he didn’t give away anything.

to hold back
meaning: to keep something a secret
example: Please hold this back until I talk with them.

to lap it up
meaning: to believe (a lie)
I felt so stupid because I lapped up all of his lies.

to let in on
meaning: to tell (a secret)
example: Can I let you in on a secret?

to add up = make sense
to back up = to support
to dig out = to find
to fall for = to believe
to ferret out = to find out
to give away = to reveal
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
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Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #63 (permalink) Tue May 07, 2013 14:43 pm   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

Hello Torsten,
Many thanks! Kati Svaby
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #64 (permalink) Sat May 11, 2013 13:23 pm   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

RUN as phrasal verb part2.

to run into' someone means to meet them unexpectedly.
I ran into Jane in reception. I hadn't seen her for ages.
Sara ran into her ex-boyfriend in the supermarket. She said it was very embarrassing.
run into somebody (informal) to meet somebody by chance
Guess who I ran into today! (összefut vkivel)

'to run on' diesel or electricity means to use them for power in order to function.
The motor runs on electricity so it's very quiet.
We have a generator that runs on diesel which we use during power cuts.

'to run out of' something means to have no more left.
I can't make a cake, we've run out of eggs.
When I was a student and my money ran out, I lived on pasta.
run out (of something) to use up or finish a supply of something
We ran out of fuel.
Could I have a cigarette? I seem to have run out.

'to run out' means to pass the time limit or expire.
I need to get a new passport. It runs out next month.
I hope they will give me a new contract when my present one runs out at the end of he month.
run out
1 if a supply of something runs out, it is used up or finished
-Time is running out for the trapped miners.
2 if an agreement or a document runs out, it becomes no longer valid
SYNONYM expire

'to run over' means to hit with a vehicle.
He's in hospital. He was run over by a car last night.
You need to know where everything is in case I'm run over by a bus!
run somebody/something over (of a vehicle or its driver) to knock a person or an animal down and drive over their body or a part of it
Two children were run over and killed.

'to run through' means to repeat or rehearse something to practice or check
We quickly ran through the program to check that everything was OK.
Can we run through it again just to be sure we haven't forgotten anything.
run through something
1 to discuss, repeat or read something quickly
He ran through the names on the list.
Could we run through your proposals once again?
2 [no passive] to pass quickly through something
An angry murmur ran through the crowd.
Thoughts of revenge kept running through his mind.
3 [no passive] to be present in every part of something
A deep melancholy runs through her poetry.
4 to perform, act or practise something
Can we run through Scene 3 again, please?
related noun run-through
5 to use up or spend money carelessly
She ran through the entire amount within two years.

'to run to' means to go to someone for help.
She always runs to me when she needs some help.
I'm too old to go running to my parents every time I need some money.
run to something
1 to be of a particular size or amount
The book runs to nearly 800 pages.
2 (especially British English) if you or your money will not run to something, you do not have enough money for something
Our funds won't run to a trip abroad this year.

'to run up' debts or bills means to owe money.
He very quickly ran up an enormous debt on his credit card.
We ran up a big bill in the hotel drinking in the bar.

'to run up against' problems means to meet difficulties unexpectedly.
We had no idea about the difficulties we would run up against.
We ran up against a few problems at the beginning but now it's fine.
run up against something to experience a difficulty
The government is running up against considerable opposition to its tax reforms.
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #65 (permalink) Sat May 11, 2013 13:34 pm   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

PHRASAL VERBS - EDUCATION

to kick out
meaning: to expel
example:He never finished high school because they kicked him out for stealing. -

to drop out (of school)
meaning: to quit school, to leave before finishing (school)
example: He became a very successfuI businessman although he never finished school. He dropped out when he was sixteen.

to put somebody through something
meaning: to pay for somebody’s education
example: If I had three sons like they have, I don’t know how I would put them through university.

to read over/go over
meaning: to review
example: We’re going to have a test tomorrow so I think I will go over our last lesson once again.

to catch up on
meaning: if you have fallen behind, to do extra work to be on the same level as others
example: I was sick all last week so there’s a lot I need to catch up on at school. -

to put off
meaning: to delay, to do something at a later date
example: I can’t put off studying for that exam any longer because it will be in two days.

to fall behind
meaning: to make less progress or be less successful than others
example: If you don’t pay attention in class, you can easily fall behind with your school work.

to hand in
meaning: to submit
example: I have to hand in this homework tomorrow so please let me do it in peace. -

to hand out
meaning: to distribute
example: The teacher asked me to hand out the corrected tests.

to read up on
meaning: to learn about something by reading a lot
example: I have to read up on the royal family because I am holding a presentation about them in English class tomorrow.

to make up (an excuse)
meaning: invent a story that is not true
example: I have to make something up as an excuse for why I haven’t done my homework.

to brush up on
meaning: (to practice) to improve one’s knowledge of something
example: I had better brush up on my French before our friends from France come to visit us next month.

From:Hungarian monthly: 5 PercAngol
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #66 (permalink) Sat May 11, 2013 13:45 pm   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

PHRASAL VERBS - HEALTH AND FITNESS

to break down
meaning: to be nervous, to go through a physical or mental collapse
example: She had a nervous breakdown after her accident.

to break out
meaning: to develop and spread suddenly
example: If a virus breaks out at a school, almost everybody gets infected. (kitör)

to build up your strength
meaning: to become stronger and healthier
example: I am better but I still have to build up my strength a little bit.

to burn off
meaning: to use up (calories)
example: He should start jogging if he wants to burn off fat. (elégetni zsírt)

to come down with something(megbetegszik vmiben)
meaning: to become ill with a not too serious illness
example: She came down with a cold she won’t come to our party tonight. -

to come round(magához tér)
meaning: to recover consciousness after fainting
example: We poured some water on him and he came round.

to cut down on something
meaning: to reduce (the intake of) something
example: She needs to cut back on smoking because she coughs a lot.

to get over something (felépül vmiből)
meaning: to recover from something
example: He’ll visit us as soon as he gets over his flu.

to give up something
meaning: to stop doing something
example: He gave up drinking alcohol because he was afraid of becoming an alcoholist.

to pass out (elájul)
meaning: to faint
example: She passed out when she saw the blood.

to put on weight
meaning: to increase in your body size
example: He eats all day and he is still doesn’t put on weight.

to take up something(ELKEZD VMIT ÚJRA)
meaning: to start some new hobby or activity
example: We feel much healthier since we took up swimming.

to work out
meaning: to exercise
example: All of my friends work out at least twice a week.

From: Hungarian monthly: 5PercAnngol
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #67 (permalink) Sat May 11, 2013 14:11 pm   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

to add up = to make sense
to back up = to support
to dig out = to find
to fall for sg = to believe sg
to fall for sb = to fall in love with sb
to ferret out = to find out/nose sth/ see into sth
to give away = leave/betray/let out/gift sg away
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #68 (permalink) Mon May 13, 2013 8:20 am   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

'to send' combined with particles.

'to send away for' something means to write to an organization to have something delivered to you./send away (to somebody) (for something)
= send off (for something)
=send off (for something) | send away (to somebody) (for something)
-to write to somebody and ask them to send you something by post/mail
-I've sent off for some books for my course.
-I couldn't find it in the local shops. I had to send away for it.
-I don't know what they are like. I'm going to send away for some samples.

'to send back' means to return something because it is not right or damaged.
The food was cold when it was served so we sent it back.
When it arrived, I didn't like the colour so I sent it back.

'to send for' means to send a message asking someone to come to see you
The baby was very ill so she sent for the doctor.
I knew I was in trouble when the boss sent for me.
send for somebody
to ask or tell somebody to come to you, especially in order to help you
Send for a doctor, quickly!

'to send in' means to send something to an organization.
Please send in the completed forms before January 31st.
The TV show is funny family videos that viewers send in.
send something in
to send something by post/mail to a place where it will be dealt with
Have you sent in your application yet?

'to send someone in' means to tell a person to enter a room or office.
I'd like to speak to James. Can you send him in, please?
I'm ready now. Can you send in the first patient?
send somebody in
to order somebody to go to a place to deal with a difficult situation
Troops were sent in to restore order.

'to send off' means to post a letter or parcel.
You should have got it by now. I sent it off two days ago.
I packed everything up and sent it off last week.
send something off
to send something to a place by post/mail
I'm sending the files off to my boss tomorrow.

'to send on' means to forward a document or mail.
Here is my new address. Can you send my mail on to me?
My colleague is dealing with this. I'll send a copy of your email on so she can deal with it.
send something on
1
to send something to a place so that it arrives before you get there
We sent our furniture on by ship.
2
to send a letter that has been sent to somebody's old address to their new address
SYNONYM forward
They promised to send on our mail when we moved.
3
to send something from one place/person to another
They arranged for the information to be sent on to us.

'to send out' means to send to a lot of people at the same time.
The wedding is in two months. We need to send out the invitations.
We sent out copies of the new brochure to all our existing clients.

'to send out' also means to emit a sound or light.
This tiny transmitter sends out a signal strong enough to be picked up a kilometre away.
The phone mast sends out radio waves that some people think are dangerous.

send something out
1
to send something to a lot of different people or places
Have the invitations been sent out yet?
2
to produce something, such as light, a signal, sound, etc.
SYNONYM emit
The sun sends out light and heat.

'to send out for' means to phone an order to a restaurant for food to be delivered/send out for something
to ask a restaurant or shop/store to deliver food to you at home or at work
Let's send out for a pizza.
I don't want to cook. Let's send out for a pizza.
It's almost lunchtime. Shall we send out for some sandwiches or snack.
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #69 (permalink) Thu Nov 26, 2015 22:51 pm   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

He started off at me again simply because I had forgotten to lock the back door. -means first I had forgotten to lock the back door and later he started off at me because of it

He started off at me again simply because I had forgotten to lock the back door after I came home - first I came home, so why there is: I had forgotten?

Thanks :)
Saneta
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 1583

Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #70 (permalink) Thu Nov 26, 2015 23:31 pm   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

The meanings are quite similar.
Start off and begin are synonyms 
The main difference is that start is both a noun and a verb.
Begin is only a verb, with beginning as its noun version.
Begin" might also be for something that has already started.
But to "start" marks the actual/exact time of launching an activity.

'START OFF' can almost always simply be replaced with 'start'.

Examples:
start somebody off (on something)
[no passive] to make somebody begin doing something
1. What started her off on that crazy idea?Don't say anything to her—you'll start her off again (= make her get angry).start somebody off doing something Kevin started us all off laughing.
to help somebody begin doing something
2. My mother started me off on the piano when I was three.
start somebody off doing something 
3. His father started him off farming.

BEGIN=to start doing something; to do the first part of something
Let's start at the very beginning
When you read you begin with A-B-C
When you sing you begin with do-re-mi
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #71 (permalink) Fri Nov 27, 2015 0:57 am   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

Saneta wrote:
He started off at me again simply because I had forgotten to lock the back door. -means first I had forgotten to lock the back door and later he started off at me because of it

He started off at me again simply because I had forgotten to lock the back door after I came home - first I came home, so why there is: I had forgotten?

Thanks :)

Hi Saneta,
I find 'started off' quite strange, I believe it is an Americanism, though, and it's very obvious it means he became annoyed with you and began to complain about what you had done. I think you realise that too.

In your first sentence:
You forgot to lock the back door, then he got annoyed,

In your second sentence:
First you came home, then you forgot to lock the back door, then he got annoyed.

So in your 1st example we don't know whether you forgot to lock the door on your way out or on your way in, but in the second example it is clear that you forgot to lock it behind you when you came in.
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Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #72 (permalink) Fri Nov 27, 2015 10:47 am   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

Hello,

I propose to try to make difference >start vs start off<. As what I have found they say that "start and begin" are synonyms but start off has another meaning. My examples are from the Oxford Dictionary and if I analyse these sentences I see the next:
1.What started her off on that crazy idea? (Oxford dic.)= it can mean: What/Who persuaded her to think of this crazy idea. Or: What have got her to think of this crazy idea.
2. My mother started me off on the piano when I was three.= start off can replace with the same verbs as above: persuade sy to do sth or get sb to do sth or argue sb into doing sth
My mother argued me into playing the piano when I was three.

3.His father started him off farming. = His father persuaded him to do farming/ to begin to do farming.

What is your opinion Bez?

These sentences are good to explain the phrasal verb start off which involves to start sth by persuasion. Or one person try to talk another person around to his/her way of thinking or argue somebody into doing something ?
_________________
Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
Kati Svaby
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin" #73 (permalink) Fri Nov 27, 2015 13:40 pm   Phrasal verb "start off" vs. "begin"
 

Thank you Bees, but why there is first Past Simple (after I came from) and later Past Perfect (I had forgotten)?
it should be inversely..?
Saneta
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 1583

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