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Meaning of rude



 
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Meaning of rude #1 (permalink) Fri Dec 03, 2004 11:50 am   Meaning of rude
 

Test No. incompl/elem-36 "Question Tags (2)", question 2

Sarah: 'You're being very rude!'
Paul: '.........'

(a) Oh I have, have I?
(b) I am, you think?
(c) Oh I am, am I?
(d) Oh it is, is it?

Test No. incompl/elem-36 "Question Tags (2)", answer 2

Sarah: 'You're being very rude!'
Paul: 'Oh I am, am I?'

Correct answer: (c) Oh I am, am I?
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what means rude?
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Rude #2 (permalink) Fri Dec 03, 2004 13:59 pm   Rude
 

What does rude mean? It means impolite.
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Meaning of rude #3 (permalink) Thu Oct 23, 2008 11:35 am   Meaning of rude
 

Hi everyone.

Could you please explain when we should use 'being'?

Thanks.
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Meaning of rude #4 (permalink) Thu Oct 23, 2008 20:26 pm   Meaning of rude
 

'Being' is used primarily to notify someone of their current behaviour, when it is changeable and temporary.

For example, if Fred is always nervous: "Fred is nervous"/"Fred, you are a nervous person".

If Fred is acting nervous and he is normally not so: "Fred is being nervous"/"Fred, you are being nervous".
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Meaning of rude #5 (permalink) Thu Jul 30, 2009 18:07 pm   Meaning of rude
 

I don't understand the use of that type of question tag. "Oh I'm" is positive so the question tag should be "oh I'm, am I not?". That's what I expected. please give me some more explanation!
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Meaning of rude #6 (permalink) Sun Sep 06, 2009 15:27 pm   Meaning of rude
 

Well, in the previous explanation i read this:

One type of explanation tag is :
" The sarcastic response or one showing surprise or disbelief where both are positive as in:
A I've worked really hard today
B You have, have you?"

...So i think this following example is this kind of tag question because when he says 'Oh I am, am I?' is
showing surprise and sarcasm.

Sarah: 'You're being very rude!'
Paul: 'Oh I am, am I?'
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Meaning of rude #7 (permalink) Fri Apr 30, 2010 11:13 am   Meaning of rude
 

Dear Johnprose,
Our dear teacher, Alan, explained it in question one completely. I copy it here for you.
Alan said:
There are three main times of question tag:
1 The sarcastic response or one showing surprise or disbelief where both are postive as in:
A I've worked really hard today
B You have, have you?

2 The response where you hope that the answer will be no from the speaker:
A I have lost all my money at the casino
B You haven't, have you?

3 The response where you hope the answer will be yes from the speaker:
A I think I locked the door
B You did, didn't you?
With regard
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Meaning of rude #8 (permalink) Fri Apr 30, 2010 11:42 am   Meaning of rude
 

Hello dear teacher ,
Well i've searched for the meaning of that word and i've foud it like that:
-Unformed by taste or skill; not nicely finished; not smoothed or polished; -- said especially of material things; as, rude workmanship.
-Not finished or complete; inelegant; lacking chasteness or elegance; not in good taste; unsatisfactory in mode of treatment; -- said of literature, language, style, and the like.
-Characterized by roughness; umpolished; raw; lacking delicacy or refinement; coarse.
-Of untaught manners; unpolished; of low rank; uncivil; clownish; ignorant; raw; unskillful; -- said of persons, or of conduct, skill, and the like.
- Violent; tumultuous; boisterous; inclement; harsh; severe; -- said of the weather, of storms, and the like; as, the rude wint
-Barbarous; fierce; bloody; impetuous; -- said of war, conflict, and the like; as, the rude shock of armies.
OK!thanks all!
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Meaning of rude #9 (permalink) Fri Jun 01, 2012 17:35 pm   Meaning of rude
 

Dear Alan,
I have chosen: a. Oh I have, have I? but it"s false. I don't understand why. Can you explain for me?
Thanks so much
Kimlien0704
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Meaning of rude #10 (permalink) Fri Jun 01, 2012 18:50 pm   Meaning of rude
 

'Have' is the wrong verb. The question says "You're being..." so the verb is 'to be' (you are).
The response should also be a form of the verb 'to be', therefore the correct response is 'I am', not 'I have'.
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Meaning of rude #11 (permalink) Fri Jun 01, 2012 19:47 pm   Meaning of rude
 

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Hi Kimlien,

There is one thing you have to remember with question tags and that is that the tag 'mirrors' the first part of the statement.

In my test:

Quote:
Sarah: 'You're being very rude!'
Paul: '.........'

(a) Oh I have, have I?
(b) I am, you think?
(c) Oh I am, am I?
(d) Oh it is, is it?

the question tag has to mirror (copy) the statement 'You're being very rude.' In other words it has to repeat: 'You are being' and that is why the answer is Oh I am, am I?

If the original statement had been: You have been very rude, the tag would be: Oh I have, have I?

Alan
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Meaning of rude #12 (permalink) Sat Jun 02, 2012 3:59 am   Meaning of rude
 

Thanks Beeesneees and Alan
I'm clear
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