Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
principal; head; chief
main
limited
obvious
operational
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

'Lie low' vs 'lay low'



 
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Say vs.tell | There's cold lamb and pasta salad vs. There's some cold lamb and pasta salad
listening exercises
Message
Author
'Lie low' vs 'lay low' #1 (permalink) Mon Nov 06, 2006 8:27 am   'Lie low' vs 'lay low'
 

Hi

I just heard in a movie:

1- He wouldn't lay low.

Shouldn't it be lie low?

Thanks

Tom
Tom
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2148

'Lie low' vs 'lay low' #2 (permalink) Mon Nov 06, 2006 9:30 am   'Lie low' vs 'lay low'
 

Hi Tom

Look at definitions 50 and 51 here.

I think that will answer your question. :D

Amy
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

Learn to use the present simple with the help of this short storyEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!How many different ways with words do you know? Subscribe to free email English course
'Lie low' vs 'lay low' #3 (permalink) Sun Apr 07, 2013 1:20 am   'Lie low' vs 'lay low'
 

Egads. I have not seen or heard that usage of "lay low" (example 50) for many years. It is almost biblical in its provenance. (Note, however, that "lay" still requires an object.)
Odyssoma
New Member


Joined: 07 Apr 2013
Posts: 1

Re: 'Lie low' vs 'lay low' #4 (permalink) Sun Apr 07, 2013 7:58 am   Re: 'Lie low' vs 'lay low'
 

YES.

It is in the Active Voice, and 'he' is the 'doer' of the action.
'he' should keep out of sight; bide his time. - lie low.

Illness could lay him low.
Bazza
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 09 Mar 2013
Posts: 193
Location: Brit, Eng

'Lie low' vs 'lay low' #5 (permalink) Sun Apr 07, 2013 12:23 pm   'Lie low' vs 'lay low'
 

The use of "lay" where "lie" is actually required is extremely common. Among many English-speakers it is the norm. According to M-W dictionary:

"lay has been used intransitively in the sense of “lie” since the 14th century. The practice was unremarked until around 1770; attempts to correct it have been a fixture of schoolbooks ever since. Generations of teachers and critics have succeeded in taming most literary and learned writing, but intransitive lay persists in familiar speech and is a bit more common in general prose than one might suspect. Much of the problem lies in the confusing similarity of the principal parts of the two words. Another influence may be a folk belief that lie is for people and lay is for things. Some commentators are ready to abandon the distinction, suggesting that lay is on the rise socially. But if it does rise to respectability, it is sure to do so slowly: many people have invested effort in learning to keep lie and lay distinct. Remember that even though many people do use lay for lie, others will judge you unfavorably if you do."
Dozy
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 17 Jun 2011
Posts: 7027
Location: UK

Re: 'Lie low' vs 'lay low' #6 (permalink) Sun Apr 07, 2013 12:34 pm   Re: 'Lie low' vs 'lay low'
 

Bazza wrote:

Illness could lay him low.

If it's mad cow disease, he might be laid low and be lowing....
SteveThomas
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 16 Mar 2013
Posts: 281

'Lie low' vs 'lay low' #7 (permalink) Mon Apr 08, 2013 22:27 pm   'Lie low' vs 'lay low'
 

Dozy:
There are more English speakers in America than Britain.
How many millions say:
"I seen him..."
"He rung me and come over to hang out."
"I had saw him..."

Concession to, what seems like, majority opinion, can sometimes be concession to mob rule.
Wanna be one of the "mob"?, 'cos I ain't gunna.
Bazza
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 09 Mar 2013
Posts: 193
Location: Brit, Eng

'Lie low' vs 'lay low' #8 (permalink) Tue Apr 09, 2013 12:05 pm   'Lie low' vs 'lay low'
 

Bazza wrote:
Dozy:
There are more English speakers in America than Britain.
I'm aware of that, but I don't understand what connection it has to what I wrote.
Dozy
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 17 Jun 2011
Posts: 7027
Location: UK

Display posts from previous:   
Say vs.tell | There's cold lamb and pasta salad vs. There's some cold lamb and pasta salad
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
http://gendersrelationships.comyet eitherThe revolting forces were just barely held at bay.I'll just have out with it?is there anything wrong with this sentence?springtime of painto deathto respond to vs responding tocompleting Accor's brand portfolio in the countryin such areas as vs in areas such asunlessto + verb with ingYahoos' writings

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail