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hair growth vs. growth of hair



 
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
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hair growth vs. growth of hair #1 (permalink) Sat Dec 02, 2017 17:46 pm   hair growth vs. growth of hair
 

Hi,

Please could you tell me which option correct is?
A) The intensive mask stimulating hair growth
B) The intensive mask stimulating growth of hair

When I translate into English, I often face a problem of choosing the correct option: noun as adjective or translating the phrase with the help of preposition ‘of’. I wonder what influences the choice. Is there any rule?
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hair growth vs. growth of hair #2 (permalink) Tue Dec 05, 2017 19:44 pm   hair growth vs. growth of hair
 

I did some searching, but could find no rule. One expert said that English speakers tend to gravitate towards using adjunct nouns (that is the official term for using nouns as adjectives) because they can be more concise. The exception is if the adjunct noun is ambiguous or unclear. For instance, in "voter awareness", would this mean voters who are aware, or being aware of voters? Many adjunct noun phrases become compound words, so for instance we must say "haircut" instead of "cut of hair".

In your example, either option would be ok, though since A) is more concise, maybe it is better. Really there is no pattern though. Even considering "hair":

"I like your new hair color." Good
"I like your new color of hair." Odd

"Give me that hair brush." Good
"Give me that brush for hair." Very odd

"The bird's feathers look like tufts of hair." Good
"The bird's feathers look like hair tufts." Odd

"He still has a full head of hair." Good
"He still has a full hair head." Very odd
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