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Idiom: to see eye to eye



 
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Idiom: to see eye to eye #1 (permalink) Fri Nov 17, 2006 19:44 pm   Idiom: to see eye to eye
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #217 "American English Idioms", question 3

The O'Ryley sisters don't get along and they never see eye to eye on any issue. What is the meaning of 'see eye to eye'? .........

(a) to disagree
(b) to see things the same way
(c) to abandon an idea
(d) to surrender

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #217 "American English Idioms", answer 3

The O'Ryley sisters don't get along and they never see eye to eye on any issue. What is the meaning of 'see eye to eye'? to see things the same way

Correct answer: (b) to see things the same way
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what is the meaning of see eye to eye
Heiner
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Idiom: to see eye to eye #2 (permalink) Fri Nov 17, 2006 19:50 pm   Idiom: to see eye to eye
 

To see eye to eye (with) means to agree.
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