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The usual adverb (noun) for 'the night of the present day'



 
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The usual adverb (noun) for 'the night of the present day' #1 (permalink) Mon Nov 20, 2006 11:39 am   The usual adverb (noun) for 'the night of the present day'
 

Business English Courses, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #42 "Basic Business English", question 2

......... I will come home early.

(a) Today at night
(b) This night
(c) Tonight
(d) The night

Business English Courses, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #42 "Basic Business English", answer 2

Tonight I will come home early.

Correct answer: (c) Tonight

Your answer was: correct
_________________________

why can't we tell it as today nite?

Ronan
Ronan
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Tonight #2 (permalink) Mon Nov 20, 2006 11:48 am   Tonight
 

'Today night' isn't standard English and 'today nite' is even less so.

The usual adverb (and noun) for 'the night of the present day' is 'tonight'.

What you can say is 'yesterday night', although it's far less common than 'last night', or the standard expression 'tomorrow night'.
Conchita
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