Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
quite; sufficiently; fairly
counter
seamlessly
enough
rarely
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Why not the "start of something bad"?



 
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Idiom: As thick as two short planks | Meaning of rambling
listening exercises
Message
Author
Why not the "start of something bad"? #1 (permalink) Fri Nov 24, 2006 3:17 am   Why not the "start of something bad"?
 

English Idioms and Expressions, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #15 "Teaching your Family to Drive", question 5

Although he only asked me to lend him EUR 5, I could see this was the thin end of the wedge.

(a) start of something financial
(b) start of something easy
(c) start of something worse
(d) start of something difficult

English Idioms and Expressions, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #15 "Teaching your Family to Drive", answer 5

Although he only asked me to lend him EUR 5, I could see this was the start of something worse.

Correct answer: (c) start of something worse

Your answer was: incorrect
Although he only asked me to lend him EUR 5, I could see this was the start of something easy.
_________________________

Hi,

I could understand c) was the best for the context but my problems were:

1. Why not the start of something bad? If worse, what does it imply (than what)?
2. What is the original meaning of 'thin end of the wedge'? Could it suggest 'start from the small and go to the big'?

haihao
Haihao from Japan
Guest





Why not the "start of something bad"? #2 (permalink) Fri Nov 24, 2006 13:56 pm   Why not the "start of something bad"?
 

.
Lending 5 euros is bad; subsequently lending 50 euros is worse.

A wedge is a triangular steel or wooden tool which is driven into an aperture (for instance, a crack in a log) to widen the aperture or split the log. The narrow end is inserted first, and then blows of a mallet force thicker sections of the wedge into the gap. But A PICTURE IS WORTH 1000 WORDS.
.
_________________
Native English teacher at Mister Micawber's
Mister Micawber
Language Coach


Joined: 17 Jul 2005
Posts: 13018

Do you know how to use the relative pronoun?English grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Here is how you can learn English the fun way! Click to subscribe to free email English course
Why not the "start of something bad"? #3 (permalink) Fri Nov 24, 2006 14:25 pm   Why not the "start of something bad"?
 

Hi,

The idea of 'worse' behind the expression is that things are going to become worse - the thin end in contrast to the fat end shows what is going to happen.

A
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 17284
Location: UK

Display posts from previous:   
Idiom: As thick as two short planks | Meaning of rambling
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on English Forums
'sleep like a top' versus 'dead sleep'Expressions with do and makeMeaning of antonymDoes the word "finish" refer to a future action?Differences among conduct, control and manageMeaning of murmurMeaning of "a devil of a time"Is this a grammar test or a vocabulary test?An account at the bank VERSUS an account with a bankWould it be allright if the 'whatever the times' were 'at any time'?Could "a bit thick" go as far as more than I could stand?Why we have to use "which" in this sentence?Difference between 'target costing' and 'standard costing'

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail