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Track versus lane



 
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Track versus lane #1 (permalink) Mon Dec 04, 2006 6:00 am   Track versus lane
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #87 "Simple Present (4)", question 9

He jumps down from the platform onto the ......... and waves at the train driver to stop. The train stops and Andrew gets onto it.

(a) path
(b) road
(c) track
(d) lane

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #87 "Simple Present (4)", answer 9

He jumps down from the platform onto the track and waves at the train driver to stop. The train stops and Andrew gets onto it.

Correct answer: (c) track

Your answer was: incorrect
He jumps down from the platform onto the lane and waves at the train driver to stop. The train stops and Andrew gets onto it.
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Why track instead of lane?

Estefania
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Track versus lane #2 (permalink) Mon Dec 04, 2006 10:00 am   Track versus lane
 

Hi,

Lane is like a path (small roadway) on which you walk. Track is where the train runs.

A
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Track versus lane #3 (permalink) Sat Sep 20, 2008 3:43 am   Track versus lane
 

Alan, please tell me why you use simple present tense in these two sentences. I thought it was a story which happened two years ago! Moreover, you have used past tense before and after these sentences in telling a string of actions done by Andrew. I'll say it has confused me !
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Track versus lane #4 (permalink) Sat Sep 20, 2008 11:06 am   Track versus lane
 

Additionally, if a "lane" happened to run past the platform (perhaps in some remote country station), you would jump down into it, rather than onto it.

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Track versus lane #5 (permalink) Sat Sep 20, 2008 14:51 pm   Track versus lane
 

MrPedantic wrote:
Additionally, if a "lane" happened to run past the platform (perhaps in some remote country station), you would jump down into it, rather than onto it.

MrP

That would depend on the way you perceive the situation and the context itself. If the lane were raised in some way, if it had deeps ditches at each side, for example, you might indeed jump down onto the lane.

into/onto the lane = to enter the lane

Which would you "recommend here", MrP?

Quote:
Cross the stile and turn left into/onto the lane, past a red-tiled cottage, until you reach a junction of tracks.
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Track versus lane #6 (permalink) Sat Sep 27, 2008 0:03 am   Track versus lane
 

Molly wrote:
That would depend on the way you perceive the situation and the context itself. If the lane were raised in some way, if it had deeps ditches at each side, for example, you might indeed jump down onto the lane.

No; "into".

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Track versus lane #7 (permalink) Sun Sep 25, 2011 0:20 am   Track versus lane
 

Zishuly asked why we use here simple present? My question: because this is a dramatic narrative?
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Track versus lane #8 (permalink) Tue Sep 27, 2011 12:38 pm   Track versus lane
 

gets onto it (the train)-> why not: gets on the train?
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Track versus lane #9 (permalink) Tue Sep 27, 2011 12:38 pm   Track versus lane
 

gets onto it (the train)-> why not: gets on the train?
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