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Notice versus comment



 
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Notice versus comment #1 (permalink) Mon Dec 04, 2006 8:55 am   Notice versus comment
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #57 "Chit Chat: At the pub", question 9

Charles: The one thing I've ......... is that he doesn't say anything.

(a) remarked
(b) connected
(c) commented
(d) noticed

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #57 "Chit Chat: At the pub", answer 9

Charles: The one thing I've noticed is that he doesn't say anything.

Correct answer: (d) noticed

Your answer was: incorrect
Charles: The one thing I've commented is that he doesn't say anything.
_________________________

difference between this two?

Maloy
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Notice versus comment #2 (permalink) Mon Dec 04, 2006 9:52 am   Notice versus comment
 

Hi,

If you use 'commented', you would have to add 'on'. Notice means observe and comment on means make a remark about.

A
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Notice versus comment #3 (permalink) Fri Feb 27, 2009 9:56 am   Notice versus comment
 

My answer was 'remarked'. Can you please explain the difference between 'notice' n 'remark', sir?
Ltvan82
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Notice versus comment #4 (permalink) Fri Jan 08, 2010 7:38 am   Notice versus comment
 

Dear teacher:
I have known that the word 'noticed' is perfectly acceptable here, but I still want to know whether the word 'remarked' would also be fit.
As far as I know, 'remark' has a meaning of to notice, observe as in I remarked a slight accent in her speech. Not like the word 'notice', 'remark' can be used as a transitive verb, so I think there is no need to add a preposition like 'on'.
In the light of above, I'm now confused about why the word 'remarked' is not selected. Would you like to explain it to me?
Many thanks in advance.
Ttg
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Notice versus comment #5 (permalink) Fri Jan 08, 2010 9:43 am   Notice versus comment
 

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Hello,

'Remark' is I would say more commonly used as a noun but of course can also be used as a verb. As a verb it is an alternative to 'say' when using direct speech. In your sentence:
Quote:
As far as I know, 'remark' has a meaning of to notice, observe as in I remarked a slight accent in her speech.
, you are right to suggest that it would be possible to use 'notice' but 'remark' wouldn't be used in that sentence. Let me give an example of 'remark' as it is used in the way I have already explained:

'I see you have changed your hairstyle', he remarked as he first entered the room and saw her.

Alan
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Notice versus comment #6 (permalink) Fri Jan 08, 2010 10:40 am   Notice versus comment
 

Thank you for your reply, Alan.

I'm afraid I didn't fully follow your point. You said:

Quote:
but 'remark' wouldn't be used in that sentence.

Do you mean that this sentence 'I remarked a slight accent in her speech' is wrong and when remark is used as a verb it can only mean 'say'?

But I found this sentence from here (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/remark?r=75&src=ref&ch=dic) given as an example in the second item and OALD says this verb can also mean take notice of something/somebody and gives another modal sentence as follow ' remark the likeness between father and son'.

I know this question is foolish for native speaker, but it really confuse me, so could you give me a further explanation please?

Thanks again.
Ttg
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Notice versus comment #7 (permalink) Fri Jan 08, 2010 11:37 am   Notice versus comment
 

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Hi Ttg,

Thanks for your reply and for the dictionary reference. To me the verb 'remark' suggests 'make a remark/comment'. It can broadly therefore mean 'say'. It can also introduce another clause as in: Remark that .... Remark on ...... Remark how ... and so on. All I can say is that I would never use 'remark' with a direct object as you have shown in your dictionary reference. I see that the reference you quote form the OALD adds 'dated/formal'. I can possibly recall seeing it in the writing of a novelist like Jane Austen (1775-1817) and that probably explains why I wouldn't use it.

I hope this doesn't confuse you further. My only comment is that it would be better to avoid 'dated' forms of the language.

Alan
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Notice versus comment #8 (permalink) Fri Jan 08, 2010 12:33 pm   Notice versus comment
 

Thank you very much, Alan.
Now I can say: 'Point taken'.
Ttg
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Notice versus comment #9 (permalink) Mon Dec 27, 2010 5:24 am   Notice versus comment
 

Hi Mr Alan
I do not understand 'dated' forms mean.

May be I need some examples from you.
Baotet
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